Now Boarding, Air Viagra?

Some headlines catch the eye like a meringue pie in the face. Today, that headline is: “Viagra reduces jet lag in hamsters.” In the article (in The Register) that accompanies this seemingly preposterous headline, it is reported that “Argentinian researchers have rather unaccountably discovered that Viagra helps ameliorate the effects of ‘jet lag’ in hamsters, and might do the same for humans.” As eye-opening as this news is, several questions remain unanswered, including the following:

1. Where precisely are all these hamsters jetting off to?
2. Do rodents travel in their own tiny aircraft or on JetBlue like everyone else?
3. Are hamsters eligible to use frequent flier miles?
4. Do the TSA and the FAA know about this?
5. Is there any concern that the hamsters, because of their size, will sneak into the cockpit?
6. In addition to boarding the aircraft, do the little buggers board each other?
7. If the Viagra is taken too soon before boarding, does that cause a terminal condition?
8. Are Viagra-drugged passengers happier passengers?
9. Can the hamsters return their seats to the upright position whenever they desire?
10. What happens if a hamster experiences an erection lasting more than 4 hours and the flight is much longer than that?
11. Is jet lag really that big a problem in the hamster world?
12. Don’t Argentinian researchers have better things to do with their time?

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3 responses

  1. this reminds me of an ig-nobel winning piece of research on the effects of prozac on clams. it causes them to spawn. i guess that cheers them up, but i wonder how you tell the difference between a clam that’s feeling ok and one that’s really depressed.

  2. Donald Wolberg

    Prozac causes clams to spawn? Would be wonderful if really good New England clam chowder were less costly because of an abundance of clams. The viagra issue is another matter, but perhaps the abundance of rodents is now explained. They must be ordering that cheap, internet pharmacy viagra. Wonder if they will share some now that they are so calm. I do not agree that human passengers would remain as calm, however, and certianly seating would need to be more carefully selected.

  3. First “Snakes on a Plane” as a movie, now “high hamsters on a plane” as an experiment — when will the cruiselines catch on?!

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