Price- Anderson Act

Kmareka readers who believe in small government, deregulation and personal responsibility– who trust the free market to solve all our problems– should look up the Price-Anderson Act. Taxpayers carry almost all the risk of nuclear power plants, corporations get the profits.

In Japan, the Tokyo Electric Power Company was responsible for its own liability. Until something happened, and now the government will make up the difference.

Too big to fail takes on another meaning here.

Trusting the industry to set safety standards and give an honest assessment of the risk to the public is also looking dubious. From today’s news

TOKYO – A major international mission to investigate Japan’s flooded, radiation-leaking nuclear complex began Tuesday as new information suggested that nuclear fuel had mostly melted in two more reactors in the early days after the March 11 tsunami.

That would mean that all three of the most troubled reactors at the plant have suffered partial metldowns.

The team of U.N. nuclear experts met with Japanese officials and planned to visit the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant in coming days to investigate the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl in 1986 and assess efforts to stabilize the complex by Tokyo’s self-declared deadline of early next year.

Meanwhile, the plant operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., released a new analysis suggesting that fuel rods in the plant’s Units 2 and 3 mostly melted during the early days of the crisis, which had been suspected but not confirmed.

In addition, some chunks of the fuel appeared to have entered the outer containment chambers, causing some damage.

That suggests that the severity of the accident was greater than officials have acknowledged. TEPCO announced similar findings last week about Unit 1.

The new revelations indicate that earlier official assessments may have been too optimistic, said Goshi Hosono, director of Japan’s nuclear crisis task force.

“We should have made a more cautious damage estimate based on a worse scenario,” he said.

A century from now, there will be places in the vicinity of the plants that will be unfit for habitation. This kind of pollution can only be partially controlled, at great cost. This is the problem Japan is leaving to future generations.

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4 responses

  1. Howdy again. Haven’t been here for awhile. Kinda’ surprised at the new look.
    Hope all is well, I’ll try to get back here more often!

    1. Hi-I am the person formerly here as Joe Bernstein(real name) and I was kinda concerned that you’d been MIA for a long while.
      Glad you’re ok.

  2. Privatized profit, socialized risk. That’s the corporations’ motto. Great post.If you really feel like tearing your hair out, consider this also: some shareholders sued one of the financial CEO’s for his dishonest behavior in precipitating the economic crisis.

    Our taxpayer dollars are paying for his legal defense.

    1. If you’re a regular person and you owe money,you’re in a jam.
      If you’re a high roller,there is never any quality of life disturbance.
      Now,there is no right/left aspect to this-it’s all about what and who you can buy.
      I don’t believe much of what I hear anymore on the media,but OTOH I really think most all conspircay theories are full of crap.
      The world is completely pathological-try to find a good place to be for as long as circumstances allow-after that,you’ve got to make some decisions which may be very hard.
      If you’ve ever enjoyed your life at some point,keep it in mind.

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