The Color of Money: A Top Bank and Nonprofit Take Aim at the Racial Wealth Divide – Inside Philanthropy 

We started writing about the Corporation for Enterprise Development a year ago, when we talked to its founder, Bob Friedman, about how the organization got its start, and where it is going with addressing asset-building and financial inclusion for low income Americans and people of color. Now, CFED has announced a new partnership with JPMorgan Chase & Co. to bring asset building initiatives to multiple cities across the country, starting with New Orleans and Miami this spring.

Source: The Color of Money: A Top Bank and Nonprofit Take Aim at the Racial Wealth Divide – Inside Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy

Who’s in Charge Here? This Donors Network Wants Answers—and Change – Inside Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy

Listening to Donna Hall, who has been leading the Women Donors Network (WDN) since 2002, you quickly get the sense that she’s someone who has weathered many battles on the frontlines for women’s equality, and that she doesn’t choose the easy fights. It’s like being with someone who wants you to understand the cold, hard truth of continued male dominance, while at the same time giving you a chance to consider what the future may hold if we keep trending in the right direction with women’s leadership.

“When I was at Rockefeller, I worked with a colleague, another woman, and the two of us were trying to get the Rockefeller Foundation to do a large international initiative on women and work, and it never really got off the ground. It’s one of the reasons that organizations like the Women Donors Network formed, to give women’s philanthropy its own place.”

Source: Who’s in Charge Here? This Donors Network Wants Answers—and Change – Inside Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy

Ed Funders Need to Think Bigger About Systemic Change. Here Are Some Ideas – Inside Philanthropy

Philanthropy’s quest to improve K-12 education feels stuck in a rut. Some of the biggest funders on the scene remain devoted to a reform strategy that so far has failed to yield transformative change, while a range of other funder-backed efforts aren’t yet operating at a scale likely to produce major breakthroughs.“There’s no dramatic change,” Bill Gates told New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof last year, summing up the results of his own foundation’s efforts, which have entailed spending billions of dollars over 15 years.

Source: Ed Funders Need to Think Bigger About Systemic Change. Here Are Some Ideas – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Gates Gives $2 Million to EdWeek

Diane Ravitch's blog

There are many fine journalists at Education Week. I count on EdWeek to be the K-12 paper of record.

That is why it is distressing to learn that the Gates Foundation gave Edweek nearly $2 million to cover technology.

“Date: October 2015
Purpose: to broaden education digital media capacity in the U.S. to share analysis, best practice, and current innovation in public education
Amount: $1,998,240
Term: 36
Topic: College-Ready, Strategic Partnerships
Regions Served: GLOBAL|NORTH AMERICA
Program: United States
Grantee Location: Bethesda, Maryland
Grantee Website: http://www.edweek.org”

I wish the billionaires would keep hands off the independent media. Can EdWeek be independent of the man and the industry that underwrites their coverage?

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Empowered Women Are Changing Philanthropy. These Experts Explain How – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence 

Some big trends aredeb professional happening in America for women, and these trends will likely be snowballing in the near future. The first trend: the growing financial muscle of women. The second: women’s growing leadership. Add to this mix the upward trajectory of women’s role in philanthropy, and you may have the makings of a paradigm shift.

In conversing with Debra Mesch, director of the Women’s Philanthropy Institute, and Andrea Pactor, its associate director, I came away with a sense of how forces are aligning, now more than ever, for women to take the lead in philanthropy and beyond, and shape public policy for the common good.

Source: Empowered Women Are Changing Philanthropy. These Experts Explain How – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Gary Sasso: Why Don’t the Billionaires Support Public Schools?

An answer to a question that has occurred to me many times.

Diane Ravitch's blog

In an article in Salon, Gary Sasso asks why the billionaires are so intent on funding privately-managed alternatives to public schools. Sasso is the Dean of the College of Education at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. After all, if they want to improve education, the vast majority of students in this nation attend public schools. Why aren’t they helping public schools? The reality is that charter schools drain funding from public schools, and they usually don’t get better results (if one considers only test scores). Many of them have a stern disciplinary regime that may raise test scores but does not improve education or the spirit of learning.

Sasso says that the huge disparities in income today and the erosion of the middle class explain more about educational outcomes than anything that happens in schools. Why are the 1% focused solely on the schools?

Sasso speculates:

Charter schools will never be…

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