Hot Topics and Trends for Women and Philanthropy, 2015 – Inside Philanthropy

As the power of women grows in society, their influence in philanthropy is simultaneously increasing. A recent study from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute, “How and Why Women Give 2015,” reveals that, due to significant progress toward social and economic equity with men, “women have never before had so much control over philanthropic resources.” On top of that, the world is going through an awakening about investing in the rights and well-being of women and girls like never before.With all this going on, major developments for women and philanthropy seem to be happening at every turn. Here is a review of some of the significant trends and emerging topics in women and philanthropy from 2015.

Source: Hot Topics and Trends for Women and Philanthropy, 2015 – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

As Women of Color Get Attention from the White House, We’ve Got Some Questions  — Inside Philanthropy

On November 4, we held a webinar called Impact Giving for Women and Girls of Color, a first-of-its-kind online forum to discuss where funding is headed for this population, featuring three expert speakers on the topic: NoVo Executive Director Pamela Shifman, Scholar C. Nicole Mason, and Southern Black Rural Women’s Initiative leader Oleta Fitzgerald.It was an amazing experience. I received several emails from attendees in the afterhours, wanting to discuss the future of this movement and looking for ways to guide and coordinate efforts.

Source: As Women of Color Get Attention from the White House, We’ve Got Some Questions   – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Hunger Is Still a Huge Problem in America. Who is Funding to Promote Food Security? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

While many families are buying all the extra fixings to make Thanksgiving dinner special, 79 percent of low-income households in Feeding America’s client base report “purchasing the cheapest food available, even if they knew it wasn’t the healthiest option, in an effort to provide enough food for their household.” We also know from Feeding America’s report, Hunger in America 2014, that food insecurity has been on the rise since the Great Recession: one in seven Americans rely on food banks to see them through. Viewed by race, the results are even more startling: One in four African Americans relies on a food bank; one in six Latinos. Meanwhile, some 45 million Americans rely on food stamps. It’s 2015, and hunger is still a huge problem in America. And it’s a problem inextricably linked to larger issues of economic hardship. In fact, many Americans who work face food insecurity, with studies finding that a growing share of food stamp recipients participate in the labor force. This is part of a broader story of the difficulties that low-wage workers face in making ends meet. Earlier this year, a study found that about 48 percent of home health care workers are on public assistance, as are 46 percent of child care workers and 52 percent of fast-food workers. Another big category of hungry people are older and disabled Americans on fixed incomes that fall short every month.

Source: Hunger Is Still a Huge Problem in America. Who is Funding to Promote Food Security? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Funders Help Turn the Tide for Juvenile Justice Reform – The Chronicle of Social Change

A new precedent was set recently when Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy announced a plan to establish 20 as the age of jurisdiction for the state’s juvenile justice system. This would make Connecticut the first state to presumptively include anyone over 18 in the juvenile justice system.Not surprisingly, the announcement was met with widespread praise from social justice and child welfare advocates. The Southern Poverty Law Center, the Vera Institute and the Connecticut Democratic Party all shared the news on social media feeds, many trumpeting it as a monumental breakthrough in the fight against over-incarceration.

Source: Funders Help Turn the Tide for Juvenile Justice Reform – The Chronicle of Social Change

Unequal Living and Unequal Funding for Women and Girls of Color

Question: If funding to support boys and men of color is a priority, with some two dozen foundations involved, why are women and girls of color not an equal priority?The fact is that few new philanthropic efforts are aimed specifically at improving the lives of girls and young women of color.

Source: Unequal Living and Unequal Funding for Women and Girls of Color

How a Reproductive Justice Outfit at a Small College Pulls in Grants from Top Foundations  – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

A small program attached to an equally small liberal arts college has been providing thought leadership and a legion of boots on the ground for reproductive justice since the 1980s. Where do they get their money, and how has this operation been sustainable?The Civil Liberties and Public Policy Program (CLPP) at Hampshire College was founded in 1981, and since that time, it has helped to fuel both movement-building leadership and activist strategy for the cause of reproductive justice. Marlene Gerber Fried, Faculty Director of CLPP and Professor of Philosophy, and Mia Sullivan, Director of CLPP, took some time to discuss their work with Inside Philanthropy recently, so we could learn more about how this organization was formed and stays funded.

Source: How a Reproductive Justice Outfit at a Small College Pulls in Grants from Top Foundations  – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy