Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area?

If you’ve ever lived in a gentrification zone, you can probably figure what the term “sustainable neighborhoods” means. These would be places where, among other things, low-income, elderly, and disabled folks aren’t bulldozed aside by development trends dictated strictly by market forces.

via Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

PUMPKINS AND PAWPAWS; RECYCLE YOUR STUFF; CANDIDATES’ NIGHT AT HALL LIBRARY, PLANT A TREE

News from the Market and beyond:

October 11 is our annual Pumpkin and Pawpaw Festival; come taste this unusual native fruit grown at Rocky Point Blueberry Farm. Of course, we will have pumpkins and all kinds of autumnal produce: winter squash, kale, chard, onions, carrots, beets, potatoes , garlic, turnips and more. And thanks to the extended-harvest greenhouses many of our farmers now have, there are fresh greens galore: spinach, lettuce and herbs. Lots of apple varieties and cider are available from Barden Orchard, too. All our other vendors will be on hand as well, and Terry Yeaw will be giving out samples of her latest preserves from Terry’s Tasty Treasures.

Bring your electronic waste to the upper parking lot: Indie Cycle will collect and responsibly recycle “anything with a plug” (there is a $10 charge for air conditioners, dehumidifiers and mini fridges). Spare a pair of shoes: Wyman Elementary School is collecting pairs of used shoes to raise funds. Please tie or rubber-band pairs together.

The Pawtuxet Village Association is holding a Meet the Candidates Night on Thursday, October 16 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the William Hall Library. Featuring candidates for Warwick Mayor Warwick and Cranston City Councils State Representatives State Senators Moderators; John Howell (Warwick Beacon editor) and Barbara Polichetti (Providence Journal reporter)

Wednesday October 15, a community tree planting will be held at Hall Manor, 70 Warwick Avenue, Cranston from 4 PM to 6 PM. We will plant a tulip tree and a sweet gum tree in front of the now barren senior high rise building. Volunteers are needed. Kids are welcome. Bring a shovel, if you have one. Parking is in the rear. For more information contact Steve Stycos at sstycos26@gmail.com

See you at the market.

Whitehouse and Manchin Touring Global Warming’s Impact on RI

From the Whitehouse press office:

 Sens. Whitehouse and Manchin to See Effects of Climate Change in RI

Providence, RI – In June, U.S. Senators Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) and Joe Manchin (D-WV) joined together for a colloquy on the Senate floor to discuss the effects of climate change and the importance of coal in America’s energy portfolio. During the course of their discussion, the Senators agreed to visit each other’s states to learn more about the effects of climate change in Rhode Island and the importance of coal in West Virginia.

Their first visit will be in Rhode Island tomorrow. The Senators will hold a media availability at 10:00 a.m. on Pier 3 in Galilee, Narragansett to discuss the purpose of the trip and take questions from reporters. Pier 3 is located next to the Block Island Ferry. Parking will be available across the street behind the Department of Environmental Management (DEM) coastal resources building, 304 Great Island Road, Narragansett, RI.

A detailed itinerary for the rest of their day is below. Reporters interested in attending any of these stops should RSVP back to this email.

Itinerary:
8:00 a.m. – Senators visit the NOAA Tide Gauge in Newport, where sea-level rise has been measured for decades. Location: Coasters Harbor Island, 1397 Perry Rd, Newport.
8:30 a.m. – Senators visit BioProcess Algae, a local business that is converting carbon pollution into products such as animal feed and biodiesel. Location: 45 Highpoint Ave, Portsmouth.
10:00 a.m. – Senators hold media availability near commercial fishing docks in Narragansett, RI. Location: On Pier 3, next to the Block Island Ferry and across from the DEM building at 304 Great Island Road, Narragansett.
10:30 a.m. – Senators depart Pier 3 for a fish trawl survey aboard the DEM’s research vessel. They will be accompanied by representatives from the commercial and recreational fishing community and will be briefed on how changes in ocean conditions affect fish populations.
1:30 p.m. – Senators meet with local experts from the University of Rhode Island’s (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography and the RI Coastal Resources Management Council for a briefing on the effects of climate change in Rhode Island. Location: URI Bay Campus, Challenger Room, 215 South Ferry Road, Narragansett.
3:00 p.m. – Senators tour Roy Carpenter’s Beach, a working class community of small beach cottages that is being forced to retreat from the shoreline due to severe erosion. Location: Roy Carpenter Beach Road, South Kingstown.
3:45 p.m. – Senators visit the Ocean Mist and Tara’s Tipperary Tavern, two local bars that are in danger of washing out to sea due to erosion. Location: 895 & 907 Matunuck Beach Rd, Wakefield.

Senator Whitehouse will visit West Virginia on Wednesday, October 22. Details for the West Virginia visit will be available soon.

Kresge Is Into Boosting Energy Efficiency, and Here’s One Housing Group It Loves – Housing – Inside Philanthropy

The trifecta of reducing carbon emissions, conserving energy dollars, and creating jobs, makes investment in energy conservation a priority for the Kresge Foundation. Meet one of its core grantees for this work.

Kresge Is Into Boosting Energy Efficiency, and Here’s One Housing Group It Loves – Housing – Inside Philanthropy.

Lead Abatement: It’s a Good Thing and Whitehouse Knows It

From the Whitehouse Press office:

 Providence Receives $3.9M in Federal Funding for Lead Safety

Providence, RI – Today, U.S. Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and Congressmen Jim Langevin and David Cicilline announced that Providence’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD) has received $3.9 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to protect city residents from the hazards of lead-based paint in their homes.

The funding will be used as part of DPD’s Lead Safe Providence Program, which coordinates existing city services to mitigate lead hazards in Providence’s low-income communities. The funding will support the building or renovation of 250 safe, healthy, and sustainable housing units in the city.

“Lead poisoning is a preventable tragedy that dramatically impacts a child’s ability to learn and has a significant cost for schools and our society. Without this federal funding, fewer parents would be able to protect their children from lead hazards that may be present in their homes. Too many children and families right here in Rhode Island remain at risk. We must be proactive and continue to invest in the health and development of our children,” said Senator Jack Reed, who was awarded the 2014 National Child Health Champion Award by the National Center for Healthy Housing and the Rhode Island Childhood Lead Action Project. Earlier this year, Reed, a member of the Appropriations Committee, successfully restored $15 million in federal funding for the CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.

“Rhode Islanders continue to deal with the toxic legacy of lead paint. In 2013, over 1,000 Rhode Island children under the age of six, including more than 400 in Providence, were diagnosed with lead poisoning,” said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, who, while serving as Rhode Island Attorney General, took legal action against lead paint companies over the risk they presented to the public. “I applaud Mayor Taveras on his efforts to respond to the health risks from lead paint, and I am grateful to see federal funds helping to keep Rhode Island families healthy and safe in their homes.”

“Lead hazards have been on the decline since Rhode Island passed crucial lead-paint legislation, but there is still much work to be done to bring our state into compliance. Lead paint poses a significant health risk to Rhode Islanders, and children in particular, and this funding will go a long way to making homes across our state safer for everyone,” said Congressman Jim Langevin.

“Children deserve a healthy home free from the serious danger of lead poisoning and these federal funds will help protect children and families from the hazards of lead paint,” said Congressman David Cicilline. “I will continue working with my colleagues, Mayor Taveras and other local officials to ensure our communities have the resources they need to remove lead paint from homes and improve the health and well-being of Rhode Island families.”

“With the support of the U.S. Housing and Urban Development’s lead abatement program over the past 15 years, our city has addressed the hazards of household lead paint in 1500 units for Providence children and their families,” said Providence Mayor Angel Taveras. “These additional funds allow us to continue the work to improve the well-being, educational potential and life prospects of all residents. I’m grateful to the congressional delegation for their efforts on our behalf.”

The funding comes in the form of two grants from HUD programs designed to help cities reduce risks from lead-based paint and other housing-related environmental hazards. Providence has received $3.5 million from HUD’s Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration program, which assists cities with the highest incidence of lead-based paint to implement programs to protect residents. The City has also received $400,000 in supplemental funding from HUD’s Healthy Homes program, which helps cities to coordinate their response to housing-related hazards.

Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market Reopens This Saturday, May 10

From Steve Stycos:

Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market begins its 12th season this Saturday from 9 AM to 12 noon, at Rhodes-on-thePawtuxet, 60 Rhodes Place (just off Broad St) in Cranston.

Just in time for Mothers Day, you will find all kinds of local goodies: veggie and herb starts, fish, spring greens, goat cheese, meat, nuts and peanut butter. We’ll also have market gift certificates available.

And NEW this year: Blue Skys Farm will be offering Small State Seeds, locally grown and packaged seeds from Scratch Farm in Cranston. They are chemical free and suited perfectly to our Rhode Island climate.

Our beginning line up of vendors includes:

Pak Express (produce, eggs, vegetable and herb starts)
PV Farmstand (meat)(Chuck roast London broil shoulder steak and eye of the round steaks all 1/2 price if pre ordered Chicken is frozen. Prices: pvfarmstand.com)
Bernie B’s Honey
LeFavorite Bakery (breads, pastries, cookies and other baked goods)
Blue Skys Farm (produce, herb and veggie starts, seeds and herbal products)
The Local Catch (fresh-caught and smoked seafood)
Beltane Farm (goat cheese, yogurt and milk)
gC Farms (produce and eggs)

Coming in the next few weeks:

Presto Strange O Coffee Truck (coffee, tea, and many other beverages, bagged fair trade coffee)

Terry’s Tasty Treasures (pepper jellies and salsas)

Wedgewood Flowers (plants and produce, eggs)

And returning later in the season, when their crops come in:

Rocky Ledge Farm aka Moosup River (blueberries, produce)

Long Entry Farm (produce, artisan breads)

Barden Orchards (peaches, apples, produce)

Returning this season also is an expanded Market Table. This booth is run by the market to bring artisan food products to our customers from local producers. We continue to offer nuts, peanut butter and popcorn from the Virginia and Spanish Peanut Company of Providence, and Rhody Fresh butter and cheese from the RI Dairy Farms Cooperative. We will also be carrying Terry’s Tasty Treasures on the days she is not at the market. Money raised from the market table goes to support this and other efforts to increase our offerings.

Our market accepts credit, debit, EBT/SNAP, WIC and Senior Coupons.

Celebrating Earth Day, Pawtuxet Market Opening Soon

From Steve Stycos:

The Friends of the Pawtuxet River and the West Bay Land Trust will be holding a trail and riverbank clean-up at the former DEM depot at 230 Warwick Ave, (on the Cranston side of the river across from Stop and Shop). The date is this Saturday 4/26 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 noon. Bring clippers, rakes, gloves or just yourself, for an hour or as long as you can spare. Help keep our riverbank and trail clear and trash-free.

We will also be planting 3 trees (2 sugar maples and a red maple) in the area now abandoned as vehicle storage by DEM. These trees will contribute to the re-naturalization of this portion of the trail and riverbank.

These are family-friendly activities open to folks of all ages and abilities. The trail is maintained by the Friends of the Pawtuxet River, an all-volunteer organization that has advocated for passive recreational use and restoration of the riparian habitat of the river for over 20 years. Maintaining and protecting this valuable natural area in our own backyard is the only way to preserve it for our own enjoyment and that of future generations.

The Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market opens our 12th season on Saturday May 10, the day before Mother’s Day. Come welcome back our farmers and vendors and get some good food and plants.

See you at the market, and the clean-up.