Is U.S. Economic Growth in the Hands of Women? The Kauffmann Foundation Thinks So – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Kauffman, like many foundations of the mid-20th century, was founded by a ROWG (in texting slang, that’s Rich Old White Guy). Ewing Marion Kauffman was a small pharmaceuticals manufacturer who hit the big time. He started developing his Marion Laboratories in his basement, and went on to grow his initial $5,000 investment into a merger with Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals in 1989, with estimated revenues of $930 million.

via Is U.S. Economic Growth in the Hands of Women? The Kauffmann Foundation Thinks So – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

This Funder Knows That Space Matters In the Face of Domestic and Sexual Violence – Girls & Women | Grants | Funding News – Inside Philanthropy

Mid-Valley Women’s Crisis Service in Salem, Oregon, is changing things up in big ways. Along with new digs, it’s also getting a new name: The Center for Hope & Safety. The newly rebranded nonprofit is getting help from the Meyer Memorial Trust, among other community partners, to build a new and larger center. With $150,000 from the Meyer Memorial Trust to buy and renovate a new space, this nonprofit will be able to better service survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

This Funder Knows That Space Matters In the Face of Domestic and Sexual Violence – Girls & Women | Grants | Funding News – Inside Philanthropy.

RI Delegates Announce Funding for Prevention of Dating Violence

From the office of Sheldon Whitehouse:

Delegation Announces $791,000 in Federal Funding to Help Combat Teen Dating Violence

Providence, RI – Today, U.S. Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and Congressmen Jim Langevin and David Cicilline announced $791,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for a study on teen dating violence, which will be conducted at Rhode Island Hospital and will focus on aggressive attitudes among middle school-aged boys.

Rhode Island Hospital and Klein Buendel, Inc., a technology research company, will use the funds to study the effectiveness of web-based games and videos in limiting aggressiveness among 8th grade boys. Researchers will also examine how to foster better communication between boys and their parents; previous studies have shown that parental involvement can be a significant risk factor for dating violence. Test subjects will be drawn from the greater Providence area. Findings from the study will be reported to DOJ’s National Institute of Justice for use in research and programming on teen dating violence.

“Significant progress has been made in preventing domestic violence and going after offenders. Yet, recent high profile events remind us that domestic violence continues, so we still have a long way to go. These federal funds will help educate more young people about the need to end domestic violence and sexual assault and advance gender equality,” said Reed, who helped pass the Violence Against Women Act.

“I am happy to see federal funding coming to Rhode Island to research this serious problem,” said Whitehouse, who wrote a provision in the re-authorization of the Violence Against Woman Act (VAWA) to help reduce teen dating violence. “Too many women are subjected to violence as teenagers, and often at the hands of the young men they are dating. Better understanding its causes will help us reduce future incidence of violence and keep our kids safe.”

“Violence begets violence, and early signs of aggression can be an indicator that the pattern could continue in later years. By focusing on young men and addressing these violent behaviors early on, this program aims to stop the cycle of abuse before it starts,” said Langevin. “Teen dating violence is an all-too-common occurrence, and I applaud the Department of Justice’s efforts to identify and address its root cause.”

“Intimidation, stalking, and violence are unacceptable and especially alarming when they are part of our children’s relationships,” said Cicilline. “Families and communities need the information and training to stop teen dating violence and I commend Rhode Island Hospital for advancing these important efforts.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nine percent of students across the country have reported being physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year.

Kali Awakes Demanding Justice

A young medical student, future doctor who would have saved lives, was vandalized like a bombed church to the point where it’s questionable whether her survival would have been a mercy.


I understand the rage and deep despair of women in India. They have been living under a terrorist threat all their lives, and it does not come from without, but within. They walk the gauntlet every day, facing random crime and threat while those who should protect the public indulge in denial and victim blaming. Women are expendable. The mistake of the six men who thought they could get away with murder was in not choosing their victim more wisely. They never expected that schoolgirls would be holding signs calling for their public hanging.

Every society has crime. What has women and men demonstrating in the streets of India is the intolerable injustice. For too long, oppression of women on the margins has been ignored. Now the depth of the suffering of women is the shame of all, and the people are calling for justice. That justice will not be satisfied by a show trial, but by real change. That justice will not be satisfied until a woman can believe that she is equal under the protection of the law.

It was about 30 years ago the first Take Back the Night march was organized in Providence, Rhode Island. It was not a triumphal march. It’s no fun to have to walk the streets of your own city, chanting ‘No More Rape’. The rule of law should be responsible for public safety. But rule of law was applied selectively and atrocious crimes were being committed without consequences.

I think that thirty years on, we are less complacent, but an individual has a better chance of justice, whether she or he is of high status or low.

A friend of mine, in our women’s spirituality group– okay, it was a coven– told me a story.

She had been active with a Zen Buddhist center, and was going through a rough time emotionally. She asked one of the monks for spiritual advice.

When they were alone together, and she was in a vulnerable state, he steered the counseling session into a sexual encounter.

She left confused, but soon recognized that this man had betrayed her trust and taken advantage. It took her about a year to get up the courage to do something about it.

She said she prayed to the Goddess Kali to keep her anger alive. To keep her from falling into niceness and premature forgiveness. To give her the angry courage to tell this man frankly how much he had harmed her.

She said that when she had finished telling him how his actions had affected her, he thanked her. She said he kept saying, “thank you.” all the time she was telling him the truth. Maybe she really did get through to him.

A beautiful and useful concept that was developed in South Africa is ‘Truth and Reconciliation’. Before reconciliation there must be truth. And that truth must be taken seriously by those in power to construct and enforce the law. We are in a new millennium, and we cannot afford to lose the best contributions of half the human race in order to appease ancient prejudice. That challenge goes out to all the world, to the daily life and struggle of every woman no matter where she lives. Like the Unitarians say–the worth and dignity of every human being.

Thanks to Summer Anne Burton for her photos of Indians demanding justice.

(Creds to this site, 10 Most Powerful Hindu Goddesses for the fierce aspect of Kali.)

Endangered Manhood

Hey, what’s the use of working as a nurse for over 20 years if you can’t laugh about some of the crazy stuff people do. Like when you stay overtime to help a guy who is circling the drain for kidney failure and he tells his doctor he’s there for the condition Rush Limbaugh will be organizing a telethon for real soon.

Rush Limbaugh Thinks He Discovers a New Disease
It’s called DUD (Dwindling Unit Disorder), and this nurse explains why a man might think he is a DUD, when really he’s a WUSS.

Marilyn Monroe: Foster Child

This is a fascinating documentary — a window into a Marilyn Monroe who wanted a much fuller identity than this crazy mixed-up world would allow. It struck me with a new depth to realize she was a foster child, after many years of working with foster children and helping them form healthy identities. It’s amazing to see Marilyn striving for new levels of identity — to be taken seriously as an actress, a creative force in her own right, and not just a stereo-type of the Dumb Blonde, sexy, but ultimately empty. She also wanted to bring others to their fullest expression as artists, helping to get jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald into the realm of stardom. She also wanted to express her leader more, and started her own production company. Sadly, it really sounds like Arthur Miller did her in by not letting her continue in her partnership with Milton Greene. Of course there were many factors in her undoing, but this movie gave me more to think about in terms of how children with vulnerable identities get co-opted by “sharks in the pool” — relationship partners who are tyrannical in the level of control they must have over the other partner’s life.

EG Candidate Mark Co-Signed Father-Daughter Dance Letter To Cranston – East Greenwich, RI Patch

It seems that Cranston has once again become the epicenter for acting out a drama that is likely being repeated, on a much smaller scale, in communities all across the country. This time the hot now-in-the-national-news debate is about father-daughter dances and how we are now calling them family dances.

Sometimes I feel like we have a special talent here in Cranston for making an issue out of things that would make common sense for us all to agree on. I wish we all could have agreed to just take the “Heavenly Father” off the prayer banner and call it a school pledge. I wish we could agree to let this family dance be our clarion call of respect for our different ways of raising children in the community. Sometimes I wonder if we were having this conversation in the presence of the children whose fathers are not available for the dance, how many of us would make the right decision and say to the children, “This is a family dance, and all are welcome. You can bring anyone you want.” But as Bob Plain points out, we are still feeling the pain from out last go-around with the ACLU, which may be driving a certain amount of the posturing and outcry.

I can sympathize with people who want this name to go away. While the pictures could line our walls of my husband and our ever-growing daughters posed side by side for the father-daughter dance photos, it’s not right for children to feel excluded. I know from my practice of social work, these issues are particularly hard on children in other family constellations, such as being raised by grandparents, foster parents, single parents, or in families with two moms. Our school changed to from the Father-Daughter dance to the Family Dance last year, and reports from our parent-teacher organization were that it was a successful event and we raised money for the school.

Carolyn Mark, who is the president of the National Organization for Women in Rhode Island, and who is running for school committee in East Greenwich, co-authored the letter that prompted the change in nomenclature. Click through to read more about the issue, including the letter she wrote.

EG Candidate Mark Co-Signed Father-Daughter Dance Letter To Cranston – East Greenwich, RI Patch.