How All That Salad Dressing Is Making the World a Better Place – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Some of the best cheer we can bring to the holidays is through homemade gifts. Paul Newman discovered this when he and pal A.E. Hotchner made salad dressing for Christmas presents for friends and family, served up in recycled wine bottles. Out of this simple giving practice came the idea of Newman’s Own, a brand Paul Newman would put his name on in 1982 with the plan of giving all profits to charity. Since that time, the company has donated over $450 million dollars to organizations in the nonprofit sector.Although Newman’s Own started 33 years ago, Newman’s Own Foundation was established by Paul Newman in 2008 to ensure that his philanthropic legacy would continue. Newman asked Bob Forrester, who has spent his entire career in philanthropy, to be the Foundation’s president.

Source: How All That Salad Dressing Is Making the World a Better Place – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

Hunger Is Still a Huge Problem in America. Who is Funding to Promote Food Security? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

While many families are buying all the extra fixings to make Thanksgiving dinner special, 79 percent of low-income households in Feeding America’s client base report “purchasing the cheapest food available, even if they knew it wasn’t the healthiest option, in an effort to provide enough food for their household.” We also know from Feeding America’s report, Hunger in America 2014, that food insecurity has been on the rise since the Great Recession: one in seven Americans rely on food banks to see them through. Viewed by race, the results are even more startling: One in four African Americans relies on a food bank; one in six Latinos. Meanwhile, some 45 million Americans rely on food stamps. It’s 2015, and hunger is still a huge problem in America. And it’s a problem inextricably linked to larger issues of economic hardship. In fact, many Americans who work face food insecurity, with studies finding that a growing share of food stamp recipients participate in the labor force. This is part of a broader story of the difficulties that low-wage workers face in making ends meet. Earlier this year, a study found that about 48 percent of home health care workers are on public assistance, as are 46 percent of child care workers and 52 percent of fast-food workers. Another big category of hungry people are older and disabled Americans on fixed incomes that fall short every month.

Source: Hunger Is Still a Huge Problem in America. Who is Funding to Promote Food Security? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

The Knight Foundation took another step forward in its work to bolster U.S. cities recently, by identifying 126 finalists in its Cities Challenge. All 26 of Knight’s communities of focus for the challenge are represented in the pool of finalists and the winners will divvy up $5 million in funding.

Over 7,000 ideas were submitted for the challenge, coming from public and government organizations, design experts, urban planning organizations, and individual citizens.

via What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

The Upscale Grocery Chain Helping Kids Grow Gardens and Eat Salad – Public Health | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy

Whole Foods, sometimes better known as Whole Paycheck thanks to the bite of its high prices, likes to think of itself as a responsible corporation with a particular interest in healthy eating. Through one of their foundations, the Whole Kids Foundation, they are helping to address better eating in schools in several significant ways—by funding school gardens and school salad bars, and by providing nutritional education to teachers.

via The Upscale Grocery Chain Helping Kids Grow Gardens and Eat Salad – Public Health | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy.

THANKSGIVING MARKET: LAST ONE OF THE SEASON

From the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market:

Tomorrow is the final day of our outdoor season; come say goodbye and go home with some delicious food from our farmers for your holiday table.

We will be holding our raffle drawing as well; tickets will be for sale until 11:30, so there’s still time.  If you haven’t had a chance to buy tickets, but still want to support our Bonus Bucks program, you can send a check for your donation to the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market, 253 Norwood Ave, Cranston RI 02905.  The market is now operating under the auspices of the West Bay Land Trust, a 501 (c) (3) non-profit, so your contribution is tax deductible.

Our winter market will commence in January.  Please sign up at the Market Welcome table, or send an e-mail to this address with Winter Market in the subject line.  We will continue to make announcements to this list as well.

Thank you all for a wonderful year; our little market is growing up, and all of you have contributed to that growth through your support for our unique community.

See you at the market.