How the Silicon Valley Community Foundation is Fighting Predatory Lending – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

The Silicon Valley Community Foundation sees itself as a catalyst for change and a leader in the community foundation sector, and for good reason. It gives out more grants than any other community foundation in the United States. With more than $6 billion in assets, this philanthropic powerhouse can push hard on new initiatives and set high standards for the rest of the community foundations in the country to aspire to.

One area where SVCF is aiming to do this is in curbing predatory lending, as part of its broader strategy of promoting economic security. SVCF gets that usurious wealth stripping practices can keep low-income households from ever building assets and getting ahead. You can’t build economic security when you’re in the red thanks to outrageous interest charges.

via How the Silicon Valley Community Foundation is Fighting Predatory Lending – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Bill and Melinda Gates bet big on the future and philanthropy – Yahoo News

I am thankful for Bill and Melinda Gates and all they have done for so many poor people in the world. But I don’t think philanthropy really has the teeth to address inequality in our country. It’s like in Medeival times when the Queen would give out gold coins to the poor. It’s a nice gesture, but it doesn’t solve the underlying problems. Unless philanthropy can change the tax structure and income distribution problems we have, it will remain a token effort to address inequality.

 

Bill and Melinda Gates bet big on the future and philanthropy – Yahoo News.

What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

The Knight Foundation took another step forward in its work to bolster U.S. cities recently, by identifying 126 finalists in its Cities Challenge. All 26 of Knight’s communities of focus for the challenge are represented in the pool of finalists and the winners will divvy up $5 million in funding.

Over 7,000 ideas were submitted for the challenge, coming from public and government organizations, design experts, urban planning organizations, and individual citizens.

via What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Churches step in with alternative to high-interest, small-dollar lending industry

With all of the problems with predatory loans (and noticing new pawn shops and 5-Minute Loan stores opening up in my city) it’s good to see how churches could get more involved in helping communities with loans. See below:

Churches step in with alternative to high-interest, small-dollar lending industry – The Washington Post.

Speak-Out for Good Jobs & Quality Care at RI Hospital

From our union brothers and sisters:

Some Certified Nursing Assistants report having to buy their own equipment to make sure they can monitor patients’ oxygen levels. Physical plant workers report troubling shortages of critical equipment they need to combat mold in ventilation ducts to patient and operating rooms. Now the Hospital is threatening to make the situation even worse by laying off more employees.

At the same time, Lifespan – A Health System paid more than $16.6 million in compensation to just ten executives last year. These individuals averaged $1 million more in compensation than the average compensation earned by CEOs of nonprofit hospitals nationwide. Meanwhile, Rhode Island’s largest healthcare employer has employees working more forty hours per week that get no health coverage.

Speak-Out for Good Jobs & Quality Care at RI Hospital.

Our Top Philanthropy Obsessions in 2015 – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

As the New Year gets underway, we could conjure up a list of “top trends” in philanthropy for 2015 or make a bunch of predictions that we would probably regret twelve months from now, along with all the junk we ate over the holidays.

But we’re going to skip such exercises and instead offer up a quick tour of the obsessions, favorite causes, and pet peeves that we’ll be indulging this year. If you’re still wondering what the agenda is at Inside Philanthropy, you’ve clicked on the right post.

via Our Top Philanthropy Obsessions in 2015 – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

From Poverty to a Paycheck: Kessler Aims to Bolster Employment Odds of the Disabled – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

A rising tide lifts all boats, and a recent study shows that as the economy improves, disabled people are enjoying a bump in their employment numbers. The Kessler Foundation wants to jump on that positive wave and ride it for all it’s worth. By expanding training and employment initiatives, the foundation is looking to fund nonprofit disability organizations who want to take their strategy to the next level with more and better ways to hook disabled people up with jobs.

via From Poverty to a Paycheck: Kessler Aims to Bolster Employment Odds of the Disabled   – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.