Category Archives: Green Urban Living

Outdoor Concerts and Other Pawtuxet Village Events

From the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market:

The weather prognosticators tell us that the heat and humidity will moderate by tomorrow, and that Saturday promises to be dry and sunny with temps in the low 80s. A perfect day for the market (and those rapidly ripening tomatoes we hope to be enjoying any day now!), and for picking up some great fish, veggies and meats for the grill.

It’s been great to have the options for salads and other cold foods on the steamy days we had this week: smoked bluefish from The Local Catch, fresh Chevre from Beltane Farm, hard-boiled eggs from gC Farm, sun gold tomatoes from Blue Skys, barely braised broccoli rabe from Pak Express, strawberries from Rocky Ledge Farm, frankfurters from PV Farmstand, wonderful lettuces from all our farmers. Cucumbers, summer squash and all kinds of green and yellow goodies continue to appear.

More hot goodies for hot days: Terry Yeaw will be back this week with samples of her pepper jellies. We hope that her green tomato salsa will be making an appearance soon, too.

LeFavorite Bakery is on vacation this week, so our guest bakery will be Little Falls Cafe. Mouth-watering scones and other goodies from Jessica’s kitchen will be available.

There are not one but TWO free outdoor music events tonight: in Edgewood and Pawtuxet Village:

At the William Hall Library, 1825 Broad St, Cranston:

Old2Kool performs at this week’s free concert at William Hall Library. The second performance of the Music in Our Town series, Old2Kool brings a touch of retro and a set list of oldies to the library’s front lawn. “Music In Our Town” is sponsored by the City of Cranston Parks & Recreation Department. Concerts are free and open to the public. Performances will take place on various Thursdays, at 6:30 PM, through the beginning of August.

For the rest of their summer calendar:

http://eventkeeper.com/code/events.cfm?curOrg=CRANSTON

And at Pawtuxet Park. Narrangansett Parkway, Warwick, the friends of Pawtuxet Village presents:
July Jazz Jam: Thursday • July 10 6:30 – 8:00 PM

Young musicians are welcome to join us. Bring your instrument: trumpet, trombone, guitar (electrical outlet available for up to 3 instruments), keyboard, bass guitar, drums, etc.
If you don’t play an instrument, bring a picnic and lawn chair, enjoy the music.
For more info on their events:

https://www.facebook.com/PawtuxetFriends

See you at the market.

Cooking for Emotional Wellness by Kiersten Marek Now Available

My new book is now available! Please visit the link below to learn more!

Cooking for Emotional Wellness by Kiersten Marek eBook – Lulu.

What Paleo Means to Me a non-dogmatic view – They Call Me Oystergirl

I may be more Paleo than I realized, based on this definition! Thanks to Rhode Island’s one and only Oystergirl, Vanessa Query.

What Paleo Means to Me a non-dogmatic view – They Call Me Oystergirl.

Celebrating Earth Day, Pawtuxet Market Opening Soon

From Steve Stycos:

The Friends of the Pawtuxet River and the West Bay Land Trust will be holding a trail and riverbank clean-up at the former DEM depot at 230 Warwick Ave, (on the Cranston side of the river across from Stop and Shop). The date is this Saturday 4/26 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 noon. Bring clippers, rakes, gloves or just yourself, for an hour or as long as you can spare. Help keep our riverbank and trail clear and trash-free.

We will also be planting 3 trees (2 sugar maples and a red maple) in the area now abandoned as vehicle storage by DEM. These trees will contribute to the re-naturalization of this portion of the trail and riverbank.

These are family-friendly activities open to folks of all ages and abilities. The trail is maintained by the Friends of the Pawtuxet River, an all-volunteer organization that has advocated for passive recreational use and restoration of the riparian habitat of the river for over 20 years. Maintaining and protecting this valuable natural area in our own backyard is the only way to preserve it for our own enjoyment and that of future generations.

The Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market opens our 12th season on Saturday May 10, the day before Mother’s Day. Come welcome back our farmers and vendors and get some good food and plants.

See you at the market, and the clean-up.

News from the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market

From Steve Stycos:

There are 2 more weeks of the winter market! Thursdays from 4:30 to 7 PM at the Edgewood Congregational Church on Broad St.

 

Add some local flavor to your Lenten, Easter and Passover favorites: fish, bitter greens, potatoes, honey and, of course, eggs are all available from our vendors.

Plus bread, soup, scones, little pizzas, and more.

 

Blue Skys Farm is featuring “Small State Seeds”, chemical-free and locally grown seeds from Scratch Farm in Cranston. Tried and true veggie varieties for the Rhode Island climate.

Friends of the Pawtuxet River and the West Bay Land Trust will be holding an Earth Day clean up and tree planting on Saturday April 26 from 9 AM to noon at the former DEM depot on Warwick Ave.(just before the bridge, across from the Stop and Shop). Bring clippers, rakes, gloves or just yourself, for an hour or as long as you can spare. Help keep our riverbank and trail clear and trash-free.

 

Our regular market opens on May 10 (the Saturday before Mother’s Day) at Rhodes on the Pawtuxet. We welcome back our summer vendors, such as Beltane Farm and LeFavorite Bakery and Rocky Ledge (formerly Moosup River) Farm. Stay tuned for more.

 

See you at the market.

FRESH CHEVRE, WARMER TEMPS, THE USUAL LINE-UP PLUS ONE – kiersten.marek@gmail.com – Gmail

News from the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market:

Finally, we should have a clear, non-arctic evening for our market.  Come back and taste the goodness from our faithful vendors:  The Local Catch, Blue Skys Farm, PV Farmstand, Foremost Baking Company, Little Falls Cafe,  and (we hope) Presto Strange O coffee truck.  Our market table will feature products from Virginia & Spanish Peanut Company, Rhody Fresh butter and cheese, Fruit Hill Apiaries Honey and Barden Orchard apples.

New this week: Winter Chevre from Beltane Farm. Market regulars will fondly recall the delightful goat cheeses from Paul Trubey’s Lebanon CT farm, sold at our regular season market.  This chevre is described as follows:

“While our goats are on winter break from milking, our cow Betsey Bigelow provides the milk for this creamy, soft cheese with a velvety texture.”

We met Betsey, her new calf Penelope, and lots of goats at the farm when we went to pick up the cheeses.  She is a sweet girl, and her cheese is delicious.  Samples will be available tomorrow.

And we will have a familiar face behind the table at the Blue Skys Farm booth:  Chang Xiong of Pak Express will be subbing for Christina for the early part of the market.  Say hello to Chang and get a spring preview.

See you at the market.

Not Counting Chickens in Cranston

Why, Mayor Fung, did you veto legalized chickens in the fair city of Cranston? Did the will of the people count for nothing? Admit it, Garden City got to you, didn’t they? All that lawn acreage with nothing but pigeons and crows to show for it. What a waste.

Stop the Presses! Chickens in Cranston!

Rhode Island Tweets ‏@RhodyTweets

#thatssocranston “@CranstonPatch: Welp, ordinance passes 5-4. You can legally raise backyard chickens in Cranston.”

They better watch out, hawks are back too.

Solar Saves When the Grid Goes Down

From today’s Scientific American, Solar Power Helped Keep the Lights on in India.

Every day, at least 400 million Indians lack access to electricity. Another nearly 700 million Indians joined their fellows in energy poverty over the course of the last few days, or roughly 10 percent of the world’s population.

Oddly enough, some of the formerly energy poor—rural villagers throughout the subcontinent—found themselves better off than their middle-class compatriots during the recent blackouts, thanks to village homes outfitted with photovoltaic panels. In fact, solar power helped keep some electric pumps supplying water for fields parched by an erratic monsoon this year.

Local and diverse, though David Biello, the author of the article, argues that we need to look at the grid in the USA, or else stock up on flashlight batteries. You can read the rest of his short and interesting blog post here.

And here’s from the financial magazine, Forbes…

While national renewable energy policies – or the lack there of – remain mired in Congressional election-year politics, the great green future has already arrived in California.

On Tuesday, state regulators announced that California’s three big investor-owned utilities – Pacific Gas & Electric, San Diego Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison – had reached a mandated target – called the renewable portfolio standard, or RPS, to obtain at least 20% of the electricity they sell from renewable sources.

In 2011, the three utilities collectively secured 20.6% of the electricity sold to retail customers from solar, wind, geothermal and other renewable power generation.

Perfect time for the USA to win the energy race and lead the world in more efficient and cheaper solar and renewable technology. We’ve done this kind of thing before, that’s why our flag waves on the moon. Now it’s time to get serious about planet earth.

It Could Never Happen Here, Right?

An inquiry by the Japanese parliament has concluded that the Fukushima nuclear disaster was largely man-made.

The parliamentary report, based on more than 900 hours of hearings and interviews with 1,167 people, suggests that reactor No. 1, in particular, may have suffered quake damage — including the possibility that pipes burst from the shaking, leading to a loss of cooling even before the tsunami hit the plant about 30 minutes after the initial quake. It emphasized that a full assessment would require better access to the inner workings of the reactors, which could take years.

“However, it is impossible to limit the direct cause of the accident to the tsunami without substantive evidence. The commission believes that this is an attempt to avoid responsibility by putting all the blame on the unexpected (the tsunami),” the report said, “and not on the more foreseeable quake.”

I can’t help noticing that ‘tsunami’ is a Japanese word.

As in the US, the Japanese people are paying for privatized profit and socialized risk. The unavoidable suffering of the earthquake disaster was multiplied by human folly– hubris, collusion, denial, complacency and greed. These are universals of human nature.

Before the world builds more nuclear power plants, consider the lessons of Japan.

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