These Donors Dig Dads: How Fatherhood is Getting Attention From Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy

There’s lots happening in philanthropy these days around fatherhood, and with Father’s Day just around the corner, we figured it was a good time to survey some of more innovative and promising fatherhood-fostering initiatives out there.

But first, a quick review of where we are in time on the role of fathers. Those of us who were fortunate enough to benefit from a positive fathering relationship understand the massive value of this. But having a nurturing and involved father was not always the norm, and in different times in America’s history, father involvement in the family has come in and out of fashion. Fathers in Colonial times were more involved with children since religious beliefs dictated that work and home duties be closely aligned, whereas 19th century industrialization required men to work away from home and resulted in women being relegated as sole caretakers of the home and children as well as “dependents” on the husband as “provider.”

via These Donors Dig Dads: How Fatherhood is Getting Attention From Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Voices That “Need to be Heard.” Inside OSF’s Global Work with Marginalized Groups – Inside Philanthropy

In the United States, discussion of marginalized groups often revolves around terms like discrimination, rights, and integration. Elsewhere in the world, though, the focus is more on inclusion versus exclusion—which, arguably, is a more comprehensive and useful frame.

A commitment to battling exclusion is core to the Open Society Foundations, which has offices in over 30 countries and partners in dozens more. By now, the OSF story is the stuff of legend—how George Soros, the philosopher hedge fund king, used his market winnings to help bring down communism and went on to bankroll a global network of local foundations to advance the ideals of open society, making sure “no one has a monopoly on the truth” and no groups are consigned to the margins.

via Voices That “Need to be Heard.” Inside OSF’s Global Work with Marginalized Groups – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

How a Cutting Edge Effort to Boost Family Financial Stability is Giving Out $3 Million – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

We’ve been keeping an eye on the Center for Financial Services Innovation, which is backing new ways to promote the financial health of Americans—especially the “underbanked and the underserved, traditionally an overlooked segment of the financial services market.”

A key premise of CFSI’s work is that companies can profitably serve the poor with low-cost financial service products—and help put the bottom-feeding predatory lending industry out of business.

via How a Cutting Edge Effort to Boost Family Financial Stability is Giving Out $3 Million – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Child Sexual Abuse: How Foundations and the Paternos are Funding Prevention – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Well, here we are again. Another child sexual abuse scandal rocks the nation. Josh Duggar, star of 19 and Counting, sexually abused multiple girls as a teenager. His behavior was reported to the police (his police records are now conveniently destroyed) and the whole thing was kept under wraps in the proud state of Arkansas as the family went on to film a “reality show” touting their ultra-squeaky-clean Christian living.

Key takeaway for youth funders: Invest more in sexual abuse prevention here, there, and everywhere. There are still way too many people involved in ignoring, minimizing, and/or covering up these crimes.

Before Josh Duggar, another recent case prompted national discussion and awareness about child sexual abuse—the trial and conviction of Jerry Sandusky. And that one seems to have spurred an increase in funding that is worth looking at.

via Child Sexual Abuse: How Foundations and the Paternos are Funding Prevention – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

“Philanthropy Needs to Go Where Government Won’t.” A Funder Looks Out for Sex Workers – Inside Philanthropy

The health and safety of sex workers: It’s not an issue most of us tend to think about every day, but it’s yet another example of how marginalized populations are often left out of essential public policy discussions on subjects like health care, housing, education, and workforce development.

That’s why we thought it would be a good idea to jump on the phone with some leaders in the field of health and safety for sex workers to find out what philanthropy is doing, and what philanthropy could do, about this segment of our community. We talked with Scott Campbell, executive director of the Elton John Aids Foundation (EJAF), and Crystal DeBoise, co-director of the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center, to learn more about what is going on for sex workers, and what philanthropy can do to bring this issue in from the margins.

via “Philanthropy Needs to Go Where Government Won’t.” A Funder Looks Out for Sex Workers – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Edna McConnell Clark’s Big Experiment to Mobilize More Capital to Help Kids – Inside Philanthropy

We’ve all heard the complaint: Nonprofits, even some of the great ones, just can’t get to the scale needed to have real impact. And funders, even ones that believe in these nonprofits, too often won’t lift a finger to help organizations really break out.

Well, here’s a story about a funder that set out to break this familiar pattern, and what it learned.

In 2007, the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation (EMCF) launched something called the Growth Capital Aggregation Pilot, which was a collaborative funding effort to mobilize $120 million in capital to “propel the growth of effective nonprofits poised for scale.”

The foundation was taking some big risks. It was taking a risk on the three social service grantees in which it initially made exponential investments. It was also risking its time and money, as it not only rounded up a number of funders to join the effort, but greatly increased its own investments.

via Edna McConnell Clark’s Big Experiment to Mobilize More Capital to Help Kids – Children | Youth | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

What’s J.K. Rowling Doing to Help Vulnerable Kids Avoid Institutional Care? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

It appears that Harry Potter books bring the power of “Lumos” to the world in more ways than one. While research suggests that young people who read the Harry Potter books are more tolerant and compassionate, and while the books have sprouted a millennial-style fandom nonprofit called the Harry Potter Alliance, the greatest contribution to human progress may be coming directly from the author, J.K. Rowling, and her profound understanding of the disservice that institutionalization does to children—and how we need to move away from it as a model to address emotional, behavioral, and social problems.

Rowling recently came to New York to announce the start of Lumos USA, the new U.S.-based outpost of the nonprofit she founded in 2005. The goal of Lumos is to redirect the care of disadvantaged children away from group homes and orphanages, and find more ways to support them, and their families, in the community. Its target is the 8 million children worldwide who are cared for in institutions.

via What’s J.K. Rowling Doing to Help Vulnerable Kids Avoid Institutional Care? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.