Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area?

If you’ve ever lived in a gentrification zone, you can probably figure what the term “sustainable neighborhoods” means. These would be places where, among other things, low-income, elderly, and disabled folks aren’t bulldozed aside by development trends dictated strictly by market forces.

via Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

This Insurance Foundation Cares About After-School Programs. Just Ask the Group That Got $4 Million  – Children | Youth | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

It’s been a busy fall for After-Schools All-Stars (ASAS), the national organization which received a windfall back in March in the form of a multi-year $4 million dollar grant from the New York Life Insurance Foundation.

via This Insurance Foundation Cares About After-School Programs. Just Ask the Group That Got $4 Million  – Children | Youth | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Saucy Salsas, Odd Fellows, and Turkey Talk at Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

News from the Market:

Enjoy the all-too-temporary silence at dinner time as the robocalls, avalanches of campaign literature and candidate door-knockers come to a brief halt after the primary. Celebrate by treating yourself to some seafood. boar sausage, chicken, goat cheese, fresh apples, a pie and, of course, a dazzling array of wonderful veggies.

Terry’s Tasty Treasures will be offering samples this week. They’ll have their usual preserves, along with green tomato salsa, sweet red pepper relish and cucumber dill relish.

Looking for something new and different? Blue Skys has a variety of the unusual and weird: cippolini onions, orange and padrone peppers, blue potatoes and others. Ask Christina and Kim for serving suggestions. Most of our farmers have out-of-the-ordinary and heirloom varieties you won’t see at most grocery stores. Dare to be different!
Tomatoes, peppers and corn won’t last much longer, so get them now.

gC Farms has their own pickles for sale this week, prepared by Harvest Kitchen from their cucumbers. They also have some awesome gourds.

PV Farmstand is taking orders for Thanksgiving turkeys and Christmas geese; a limited amount are available and a $40 deposit is required. He also has frozen free-range chickens; please pre-order (go to his website for e-mail info). You can also pre-order your fish from The Local Catch for pick-up at the market.

See you at the market.

Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide — a Helpful Primer for Middle Age

laniNow that I am at the age that I find myself thinking about my bones and how they are doing, I was happy to find Dr. Lani’s No-Nonsense Bone Health Guide by Lani Simpson, DC, CCD. For people like me who have questions about whether you are getting the right nutrients for optimal bone health, or whether your back pains require special attention, Dr. Lani’s book is quite helpful.

The book is broken down into sections that explain the kind of testing and tools that doctors use to diagnose bone density and assess you for your personal fracture risk.  It then goes on to:

  • explore osteoporosis medications (for me, it is the big question of whether someday I will be asked to consider taking Fosamax, which my mother took);
  • describe alternative medications (this covers the gamut of supplements out there touting their bone health benefits);
  • discuss hormones (another big question we middle age women face — whether to use hormone replacement therapy);
  • explain how to assess your own gut health and understand how it impacts your bone health.

The final two chapters are dedicated to food and exercise — the two major lifestyle keys to healthy bones. I picked up some good reminders for myself in these chapters — mainly to keep up a raw food/real food diet as much as possible, and to keep up daily exercise.

I found this book highly accessible and readily applicable to my own life experience and the questions I have about bone health.  In particular, it helped me to understand some of the connections between how food is absorbed and bone is created and recreated in our bodies.  I would recommend this book to anyone who is having back problems or is worried about their future bone health.  This book will help you decide how to resolve your problem, and it will give you the information to ask much more detailed questions of the practitioners you may end up seeing for bone health.

Tomatoes Are in at Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

From the Market:

Juicy tomatoes, plump corn, crisp cukes and perhaps some blushing peaches will be showing up this Saturday at our farmers’ tables. Tons o’ squash will be mounded in all their glorious variety: summer, zucchini, pattipan, and even some butternut and spaghetti squash. Bring your bags and “pick your own” to take home.

Thank you to all our customers who came out in the showers to support our farmers and vendors. Your commitment to our market community makes it possible for them to continue to bring you the best fresh local products every week. We appreciate you!

The samplings scheduled for last week were postponed due the wet weather, but we hope they will go on later this month. Frank Martinelli’s marinara sauce and herbalicious dishes from Blue Skys Farm should be on offer in the near future.

Terry Yeaw of Terry’s Tasty Treasures will be on hand with tastings of hot pepper and other savory jellies. Allison Hamel Dahlquist of Long Entry Farm has also been slaving over a hot stove in her farm kitchen producing rhubarb and dandelion preserves. Not only have these hardy women done the hard physical labor necessary to produce their wares, they have also put in hours researching and refining their recipes. They both have great suggestions for pairing the preserves with other foods for some unique meals.

See you at the market.

A Farmer’s Marriage Proposal and Other News from the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

Growing ProposalFrom the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market:

Farmers are nothing if not practical, and even when romance is in the air, it’s often difficult for them to get off the tractor, dress up and go out for a special dinner. So when gC Farms’ Chris Mezak decided to propose to his long-time partner Gwen Stokes, he combined business with pleasure by planting beans in a newly cleared field spelling out “WILL U MARRY ME?” When the green letters began to be legible, Chris asked Gwen to go check on the beans. She read the message and gladly accepted; Chris sealed the deal with a lovely black diamond ring, which Gwen was sporting at last week’s market. Congratulations and best wishes to the happy couple; long may they farm together.

At last, the tomatoes are ripening on the vines and soon we’ll be seeing in all their glorious redness at every farmer’s stall. Sliced and dressed with olive oil and basil, on a margherita pizza, or just sprinkled with a little salt and devoured whole, tomatoes are the ultimate reward of buying local. Nothing compares with the taste of heirloom varieties, bred for flavor not looks, and fresh from the fields.

Combine with foods from all our other vendors for fantastic summer feasts. They won’t last forever.

This week we”ll be hosting Urban Greens Food Co-op. Stop by their table and find out how you can help. Urban Greens Food Co-op is a consumer-owned cooperative working to open a full-scale retail grocery store in Providence, RI. The store will provide and promote healthy, affordable, sustainably-sourced, and local food options.

See you at the market.