How Banks Kill the American Dream and Risk Economic Nuclear Meltdown

How do you kill the American dream? One way is to finance people in over their heads, in essence creating debtors out of hard-working people who, in a more sane economy, would be accruing assets. It appears we are ready to go down the path of deregulation again all too quickly. From the New York Times:

“Financial deregulation is similar to relaxing rules on nuclear power plants,” argue Anton Korinek of Johns Hopkins University and Jonathan Kreamer of the University of Maryland in a related working paper for the Bank for International Settlements. It makes it easier and more profitable for the utilities, their shareholders and executives. It might also help ordinary Americans get cheaper electricity. “However, it comes at a heightened risk of nuclear meltdowns that impose massive negative externalities on the rest of society.”

Read more at More Renters, Less Risk for Wall St. – NYTimes.com.

And, for a first-hand account of what it feels like to be ripped off by an unscrupulous bank: http://www.rifuture.org/the-mortgage-debt-crisis-murders-the-american-dream.html

Wells Fargo Is Giving Housing Groups Millions of Dollars. Here’s the Irony in That. – Inside Philanthropy

It’s hard to know how many people lost their homes thanks to this bank’s abusive lending and foreclosure practices, but the answer is probably “a lot.”

Wells Fargo Is Giving Housing Groups Millions of Dollars. Here’s the Irony in That. – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

This Foundation CEO Isn’t Alone in Grappling with Race – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

We were struck by a blog post last month by Doug Stamm, CEO of the Meyer Memorial Trust, entitled: “Doug Stamm on the foundation’s—and his own—racial equity journey.” In it, Stamm discusses his transformation from not being “meaningfully involved in the struggle” for race equity five years ago to becoming more meaningfully involved now.

via This Foundation CEO Isn’t Alone in Grappling with Race – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area?

If you’ve ever lived in a gentrification zone, you can probably figure what the term “sustainable neighborhoods” means. These would be places where, among other things, low-income, elderly, and disabled folks aren’t bulldozed aside by development trends dictated strictly by market forces.

via Why Is a Health Funder Backing Work on “Sustainable Neighborhoods” in the Bay Area? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Why Did the Weinberg Foundation Help Revamp the Imperial Hotel in Atlanta? – Housing – Inside Philanthropy

Weinberg is a major ally for groups that support low-income and vulnerable populations, including in the housing arena. We look at why the foundation backed a supportive housing project that opened earlier this year.

Why Did the Weinberg Foundation Help Revamp the Imperial Hotel in Atlanta? – Housing – Inside Philanthropy.

Behind the Fund for New Jersey’s Support of a Housing Rights Group – Housing – Inside Philanthropy

With its largest grant to date from the Fund for New Jersey, Fair Share Housing Center (FSHC) is charging ahead with its mission to expand affordable housing and fight exclusionary zoning throughout New Jersey.

via Behind the Fund for New Jersey’s Support of a Housing Rights Group – Housing – Inside Philanthropy.

Kresge Is Into Boosting Energy Efficiency, and Here’s One Housing Group It Loves – Housing – Inside Philanthropy

The trifecta of reducing carbon emissions, conserving energy dollars, and creating jobs, makes investment in energy conservation a priority for the Kresge Foundation. Meet one of its core grantees for this work.

Kresge Is Into Boosting Energy Efficiency, and Here’s One Housing Group It Loves – Housing – Inside Philanthropy.