BUYING AT OUR MARKET IS A SNAP; HORSES AND HAYRIDES, TRINITY CHURCH BAKES

From the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market:

Rain promises to hold off until the afternoon on Saturday, so spend the morning gathering great fall food and decorative elements from our farmers. Pumpkins, gourds and corn stalks make attractive and sustainable displays for Halloween, Sukkot and Thanksgiving.

Remember that our market accepts SNAP/EBT at the market welcome table, and that we offer a 40% bonus that can buy more fruits, vegetables and herbs. We also take WIC and Senior coupons.

And the hayrides are coming! Friends of Pawtuxet Village sponsors this annual event, with a horse drawn wagon trotting through the village. Reservations recommended.

Trinity Church will be selling delicious treats tomorrow as well.

And Farmer Frank of PV Farmstand has extra lean sliced bacon, on sale for $9.99 /lb for preorders. He also says the turkeys are going fast, so reserve yours today.

See you at the market.

Lead Abatement: It’s a Good Thing and Whitehouse Knows It

From the Whitehouse Press office:

 Providence Receives $3.9M in Federal Funding for Lead Safety

Providence, RI – Today, U.S. Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and Congressmen Jim Langevin and David Cicilline announced that Providence’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD) has received $3.9 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to protect city residents from the hazards of lead-based paint in their homes.

The funding will be used as part of DPD’s Lead Safe Providence Program, which coordinates existing city services to mitigate lead hazards in Providence’s low-income communities. The funding will support the building or renovation of 250 safe, healthy, and sustainable housing units in the city.

“Lead poisoning is a preventable tragedy that dramatically impacts a child’s ability to learn and has a significant cost for schools and our society. Without this federal funding, fewer parents would be able to protect their children from lead hazards that may be present in their homes. Too many children and families right here in Rhode Island remain at risk. We must be proactive and continue to invest in the health and development of our children,” said Senator Jack Reed, who was awarded the 2014 National Child Health Champion Award by the National Center for Healthy Housing and the Rhode Island Childhood Lead Action Project. Earlier this year, Reed, a member of the Appropriations Committee, successfully restored $15 million in federal funding for the CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.

“Rhode Islanders continue to deal with the toxic legacy of lead paint. In 2013, over 1,000 Rhode Island children under the age of six, including more than 400 in Providence, were diagnosed with lead poisoning,” said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse, who, while serving as Rhode Island Attorney General, took legal action against lead paint companies over the risk they presented to the public. “I applaud Mayor Taveras on his efforts to respond to the health risks from lead paint, and I am grateful to see federal funds helping to keep Rhode Island families healthy and safe in their homes.”

“Lead hazards have been on the decline since Rhode Island passed crucial lead-paint legislation, but there is still much work to be done to bring our state into compliance. Lead paint poses a significant health risk to Rhode Islanders, and children in particular, and this funding will go a long way to making homes across our state safer for everyone,” said Congressman Jim Langevin.

“Children deserve a healthy home free from the serious danger of lead poisoning and these federal funds will help protect children and families from the hazards of lead paint,” said Congressman David Cicilline. “I will continue working with my colleagues, Mayor Taveras and other local officials to ensure our communities have the resources they need to remove lead paint from homes and improve the health and well-being of Rhode Island families.”

“With the support of the U.S. Housing and Urban Development’s lead abatement program over the past 15 years, our city has addressed the hazards of household lead paint in 1500 units for Providence children and their families,” said Providence Mayor Angel Taveras. “These additional funds allow us to continue the work to improve the well-being, educational potential and life prospects of all residents. I’m grateful to the congressional delegation for their efforts on our behalf.”

The funding comes in the form of two grants from HUD programs designed to help cities reduce risks from lead-based paint and other housing-related environmental hazards. Providence has received $3.5 million from HUD’s Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration program, which assists cities with the highest incidence of lead-based paint to implement programs to protect residents. The City has also received $400,000 in supplemental funding from HUD’s Healthy Homes program, which helps cities to coordinate their response to housing-related hazards.

RI Delegates Announce Funding for Prevention of Dating Violence

From the office of Sheldon Whitehouse:

Delegation Announces $791,000 in Federal Funding to Help Combat Teen Dating Violence

Providence, RI – Today, U.S. Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and Congressmen Jim Langevin and David Cicilline announced $791,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for a study on teen dating violence, which will be conducted at Rhode Island Hospital and will focus on aggressive attitudes among middle school-aged boys.

Rhode Island Hospital and Klein Buendel, Inc., a technology research company, will use the funds to study the effectiveness of web-based games and videos in limiting aggressiveness among 8th grade boys. Researchers will also examine how to foster better communication between boys and their parents; previous studies have shown that parental involvement can be a significant risk factor for dating violence. Test subjects will be drawn from the greater Providence area. Findings from the study will be reported to DOJ’s National Institute of Justice for use in research and programming on teen dating violence.

“Significant progress has been made in preventing domestic violence and going after offenders. Yet, recent high profile events remind us that domestic violence continues, so we still have a long way to go. These federal funds will help educate more young people about the need to end domestic violence and sexual assault and advance gender equality,” said Reed, who helped pass the Violence Against Women Act.

“I am happy to see federal funding coming to Rhode Island to research this serious problem,” said Whitehouse, who wrote a provision in the re-authorization of the Violence Against Woman Act (VAWA) to help reduce teen dating violence. “Too many women are subjected to violence as teenagers, and often at the hands of the young men they are dating. Better understanding its causes will help us reduce future incidence of violence and keep our kids safe.”

“Violence begets violence, and early signs of aggression can be an indicator that the pattern could continue in later years. By focusing on young men and addressing these violent behaviors early on, this program aims to stop the cycle of abuse before it starts,” said Langevin. “Teen dating violence is an all-too-common occurrence, and I applaud the Department of Justice’s efforts to identify and address its root cause.”

“Intimidation, stalking, and violence are unacceptable and especially alarming when they are part of our children’s relationships,” said Cicilline. “Families and communities need the information and training to stop teen dating violence and I commend Rhode Island Hospital for advancing these important efforts.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nine percent of students across the country have reported being physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year.

Saucy Salsas, Odd Fellows, and Turkey Talk at Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

News from the Market:

Enjoy the all-too-temporary silence at dinner time as the robocalls, avalanches of campaign literature and candidate door-knockers come to a brief halt after the primary. Celebrate by treating yourself to some seafood. boar sausage, chicken, goat cheese, fresh apples, a pie and, of course, a dazzling array of wonderful veggies.

Terry’s Tasty Treasures will be offering samples this week. They’ll have their usual preserves, along with green tomato salsa, sweet red pepper relish and cucumber dill relish.

Looking for something new and different? Blue Skys has a variety of the unusual and weird: cippolini onions, orange and padrone peppers, blue potatoes and others. Ask Christina and Kim for serving suggestions. Most of our farmers have out-of-the-ordinary and heirloom varieties you won’t see at most grocery stores. Dare to be different!
Tomatoes, peppers and corn won’t last much longer, so get them now.

gC Farms has their own pickles for sale this week, prepared by Harvest Kitchen from their cucumbers. They also have some awesome gourds.

PV Farmstand is taking orders for Thanksgiving turkeys and Christmas geese; a limited amount are available and a $40 deposit is required. He also has frozen free-range chickens; please pre-order (go to his website for e-mail info). You can also pre-order your fish from The Local Catch for pick-up at the market.

See you at the market.

Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market: Peaches, Beans, Tomatoes and Samples

News from the Market:

Barden Orchard peaches are still coming in; ripe and juicy, they are here for only a short time so enjoy them now! Early apples are also appearing.

Farmer Frank reports that he will have shell beans this week. According to Mother Earth News: “Horticultural beans (also called shell, wren’s egg, bird egg, speckled cranberry, or October beans) come in both pole and dwarf varieties and can produce big harvests in small gardens. The colorful, mottled pods can be eaten like snap beans when young, but most people prefer to use the rich, nutty, red-speckled seeds, which mature in 65 to 70 days, as fresh shell beans and for canning and freezing. Some Southerners claim horticultural beans are best after the pods begin to turn slightly dry or “shucky.”

Tomatoes are incredible in their variety at our market this year. Try out the heirloom varieties that the farmers are growing: cut up a bunch of different kinds and have your own taste test to see which are your favorites.

And of course, there are greens, squash, corn, eggplant, peppers, onions, beets… and that’s only the produce. We also have herbs, flowers, plants, eggs, nime chow, baked goods, preserves, meat, fish, nuts and peanut butter, cheese and butter.

This Saturday, local chef Zoey (with her able assistants Hazel, Emily and Jonathon) returns for the first of 3 cooking demonstrations using foods from our vendors. Stop by and taste the fresh goodies.

See you at the market.