BUYING AT OUR MARKET IS A SNAP; HORSES AND HAYRIDES, TRINITY CHURCH BAKES

From the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market:

Rain promises to hold off until the afternoon on Saturday, so spend the morning gathering great fall food and decorative elements from our farmers. Pumpkins, gourds and corn stalks make attractive and sustainable displays for Halloween, Sukkot and Thanksgiving.

Remember that our market accepts SNAP/EBT at the market welcome table, and that we offer a 40% bonus that can buy more fruits, vegetables and herbs. We also take WIC and Senior coupons.

And the hayrides are coming! Friends of Pawtuxet Village sponsors this annual event, with a horse drawn wagon trotting through the village. Reservations recommended.

Trinity Church will be selling delicious treats tomorrow as well.

And Farmer Frank of PV Farmstand has extra lean sliced bacon, on sale for $9.99 /lb for preorders. He also says the turkeys are going fast, so reserve yours today.

See you at the market.

Saucy Salsas, Odd Fellows, and Turkey Talk at Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

News from the Market:

Enjoy the all-too-temporary silence at dinner time as the robocalls, avalanches of campaign literature and candidate door-knockers come to a brief halt after the primary. Celebrate by treating yourself to some seafood. boar sausage, chicken, goat cheese, fresh apples, a pie and, of course, a dazzling array of wonderful veggies.

Terry’s Tasty Treasures will be offering samples this week. They’ll have their usual preserves, along with green tomato salsa, sweet red pepper relish and cucumber dill relish.

Looking for something new and different? Blue Skys has a variety of the unusual and weird: cippolini onions, orange and padrone peppers, blue potatoes and others. Ask Christina and Kim for serving suggestions. Most of our farmers have out-of-the-ordinary and heirloom varieties you won’t see at most grocery stores. Dare to be different!
Tomatoes, peppers and corn won’t last much longer, so get them now.

gC Farms has their own pickles for sale this week, prepared by Harvest Kitchen from their cucumbers. They also have some awesome gourds.

PV Farmstand is taking orders for Thanksgiving turkeys and Christmas geese; a limited amount are available and a $40 deposit is required. He also has frozen free-range chickens; please pre-order (go to his website for e-mail info). You can also pre-order your fish from The Local Catch for pick-up at the market.

See you at the market.

Munch Some Marinara or Get a Job at the Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market

From the market:

Our first September market brings more corn, squash, beans, peppers, cukes and enough kinds of greens to make a different one every night.

PV Farmstand will have their delayed sampling of Farmer Frank’s marinara sauce. Take a taste, take some home.

The Local Catch is looking for folks to staff their booths at our market and others throughout the state. Contact them at

The Local Catch, Inc.
PO Box 1326
Charlestown, RI 02813
Ph. 401-284-1195
Fax 401-284-1239

See you at the market.

Pawtuxet Village Farmer’s Market: Peaches, Beans, Tomatoes and Samples

News from the Market:

Barden Orchard peaches are still coming in; ripe and juicy, they are here for only a short time so enjoy them now! Early apples are also appearing.

Farmer Frank reports that he will have shell beans this week. According to Mother Earth News: “Horticultural beans (also called shell, wren’s egg, bird egg, speckled cranberry, or October beans) come in both pole and dwarf varieties and can produce big harvests in small gardens. The colorful, mottled pods can be eaten like snap beans when young, but most people prefer to use the rich, nutty, red-speckled seeds, which mature in 65 to 70 days, as fresh shell beans and for canning and freezing. Some Southerners claim horticultural beans are best after the pods begin to turn slightly dry or “shucky.”

Tomatoes are incredible in their variety at our market this year. Try out the heirloom varieties that the farmers are growing: cut up a bunch of different kinds and have your own taste test to see which are your favorites.

And of course, there are greens, squash, corn, eggplant, peppers, onions, beets… and that’s only the produce. We also have herbs, flowers, plants, eggs, nime chow, baked goods, preserves, meat, fish, nuts and peanut butter, cheese and butter.

This Saturday, local chef Zoey (with her able assistants Hazel, Emily and Jonathon) returns for the first of 3 cooking demonstrations using foods from our vendors. Stop by and taste the fresh goodies.

See you at the market.

August Harvest at Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market

News from the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market:

The first August market will bring us a bonanza of fresh produce: greens, nime chow and eggs from Pak Express: tomatoes and peppers from PV Farmstand,; herbs, lettuce and flowers from Blue Skys Farm; corn and squash from gCFarms, eggplant, jams and cukes from LongEntry Farm; blueberries and broccoli from Rocky Ledge Farm. And just MAYBE Barden Family Orchard will appear this Saturday… we’ll have to wait until market day to see.

And don’t forget the vendors with locally produced or harvested foods: meat from Baffoni Poultry and PV Farmstand, freshly caught seafood from the Local Catch, breads and pastries from LeFavorite Bakery and Long Entry Farm, goat cheeses and yogurt from Beltane Farm, honey from Bernie B’s Bees, plants and eggs from Wedgewood Flowers, and from our Market Table: pepper jams from Terry’s Tasty Treasures, peanut butter, nuts and popcorn from the Virginia and Spanish Peanut Company, olive oils and balsamic vinegars from the Olive Tap, and cheese and butter from Rhody Fresh (made with milk and cream from Rhode Island cows untreated with hormones). Did we mention the many delicious beverages served up by the Presto Strange O coffee truck, along with locally-roasted coffee to take home?

Two of our farmers will be offering tastes of their goods this weekend:

PV Farmstand will be sampling farmer Frank Martinelli’s Marinara Sauce, which is being processed by FarmFresh RI’s Harvest Kitchen facility through the Open Kitchen initiative. This is a great project which will enable more farmers to preserve their harvest and to make more local goodness available year round.

Blue Skys Farm’s fresh herbs will be incorporated in recipes prepared by Little Falls Cafe’s Jess Watts. On the menu for tasting: Holy Tomato Basil soup, caprese salad, and herbalicious smoothies. Recipes for these and other dishes using Blue Skys herbs will be available.

Speaking of herbs and Blue Skys, farmer Christina Dedora is looking for fans for her drying loft. If you have any box or floor fans that you are no longer using, please consider “recycling” them to a fragrant new home.

See you at the market.

Gluten Freedom — An Essential Guide to Gluten Issues, with Recipes!

glufreeDuring the writing of my own book on cooking to nourish your archetypes, I read Gluten Freedom by Dr. Alessio Fasano, MD, Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Given that many of my own recipes feature gluten-free alternatives, I was eager to read an expert’s version of the history of gluten-related illnesses and to learn more about the current state of treatment. Dr. Fasano’s book did not disappoint. The book contains a comprehensive review of the spectrum of gluten-related disorders, and also includes chapters on discussing leaky gut (you’ll get introduced to zonulin) as well as gluten’s influence on brain chemistry. Gluten Freedom also discusses new treatments and therapies, including enzyme therapy, a “celiac pill” treatment, and the possible development of a therapeutic vaccine. The book also talks about methods for prevention including delaying gluten introduction until one year of age, which is now being studied.

Taking the subject to a richer level of detail and creativity, Gluten Freedom also offers several recipes to remove gluten from the menu including all-time favorites like chocolate chip cookies and gluten-free scones. There is a charming chapter called “Dinner with Dr. Fasano” where we learn about the region, Campania, where Dr. Fasano spent his childhood. He then offers what sounds like a heavenly five-course meal of gluten-free specialties including Capri Salad featuring Mozzarella di bufala di Campania — the soft mozzarella cheese from the Dr.’s home region.

I like how this book provides comprehensive information on gluten issues including an appendix of apps for mobile phones as well as an extensive list for recommended reading. There are also some excellent practical features like a “Wheat Alert” table of menu items that contain wheat, and a stage-by-stage life guide for how to avoid gluten from cradle to grave.

After finishing the book, I was still left with a question, which I posed to the authors: “Is there any value in a low-gluten diet even if you don’t have gluten sensitivity? Does it help to diversify the grains we eat? If gluten calories are substituted with more fruits and vegetables, would that be better for overall health?”

Pam Cureton, one of the contributing writers for the book and a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment, responded:

“No, there is no advantage to following a low-gluten diet for those who tolerate gluten. There is, however, an advantage to eating more whole, natural foods and reducing the amount of processed foods to reduce unwanted levels of sodium, sugar, fats and extra calories. For people who tolerate gluten, these are the problem ingredients, not the wheat, rye or barley. Including these as whole grains along with other ancient grains, amaranth, millet, sorghum and others, would benefit everyone.”

I’m glad my own oatmeal-chocolate chip cookie recipe contains sorghum! Thanks, Pam! And thanks to Dr. Fasano and all the contributors to Gluten Freedom — helping us navigate this difficult health and dietary issue.

Link to Gluten Freedom on Amazon