New Momentum After a Long Fight: Inside Kellogg’s Push on Children and Equity – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy

The high percentage of U.S. children living in poverty—one in five, at last count—hasn’t changed much in the past few decades. And while you’d think that would be a national scandal, this issue has just never had the political traction advocates have hoped.

Lately, though, things seem to be changing. Early childhood education is moving up on the national agenda and a new book by Robert Putnam on the deeply unequal lives of American children has received wide attention. Amid a growing debate over inequality, and also race, fresh opportunities are emerging to improve the lives of kids.

via New Momentum After a Long Fight: Inside Kellogg’s Push on Children and Equity – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Feature CoPromoter: Social Change Advocate Kiersten Marek | CoPromote Blog

The internet is a great platform to voice your ideas and advocate for social change. Kiersten Marek, writer for news website Inside Philanthropy, uses CoPromote to spread her knowledge and connect with other like minded individuals. Using real life experience, she brings different perspective on many issues. Check out the chat we had with Kiersten below about her content, and the issues she is most passionate about!

via Feature CoPromoter: Social Change Advocate Kiersten Marek | CoPromote Blog.

Data Analytics and Child Protection in Los Angeles | The Chronicle of Social Change

On Wednesday, July 22, Los Angeles County’s recently formed Office of Child Protection will hold a community forum to discuss the simultaneously disquieting and promising prospect of using “big data” to help determine which children are the most likely to be abused.

The question of whether child welfare agencies should apply a statistical discipline called “predictive analytics,” which uses data to infer what may happen in the future, has sparked a now global debate weighing civil liberties, racial profiling and the alluring potential of accurately directing limited public funds to better protect children. Despite the understandable fears that come with applying an algorithm to the very human question of family dysfunction versus family strength, evidence from its use in other child welfare administrations shows promise.

via Data Analytics and Child Protection in Los Angeles | The Chronicle of Social Change.

A New Foundation That Believes in the Power of Play – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

A new foundation is on the scene to help bolster funding for early childhood development. And what do they want little kids to do? Calculus in the cradle? Digital skills training in diapers? SAT prep in kindergarten?

Thankfully, no. The Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood has its priorities straight and knows a few things about how to support our littlest folk, and more academic pressure and testing is not what they are into. Play—physical, emotional, verbal—in early childhood is what this foundation is all about.

via A New Foundation That Believes in the Power of Play – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

How a Cutting Edge Effort to Boost Family Financial Stability is Giving Out $3 Million – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

We’ve been keeping an eye on the Center for Financial Services Innovation, which is backing new ways to promote the financial health of Americans—especially the “underbanked and the underserved, traditionally an overlooked segment of the financial services market.”

A key premise of CFSI’s work is that companies can profitably serve the poor with low-cost financial service products—and help put the bottom-feeding predatory lending industry out of business.

via How a Cutting Edge Effort to Boost Family Financial Stability is Giving Out $3 Million – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

“Philanthropy Needs to Go Where Government Won’t.” A Funder Looks Out for Sex Workers – Inside Philanthropy

The health and safety of sex workers: It’s not an issue most of us tend to think about every day, but it’s yet another example of how marginalized populations are often left out of essential public policy discussions on subjects like health care, housing, education, and workforce development.

That’s why we thought it would be a good idea to jump on the phone with some leaders in the field of health and safety for sex workers to find out what philanthropy is doing, and what philanthropy could do, about this segment of our community. We talked with Scott Campbell, executive director of the Elton John Aids Foundation (EJAF), and Crystal DeBoise, co-director of the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center, to learn more about what is going on for sex workers, and what philanthropy can do to bring this issue in from the margins.

via “Philanthropy Needs to Go Where Government Won’t.” A Funder Looks Out for Sex Workers – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Hope on Mental Health, With an Unusual Funding Model – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Mental health is easily the most frustrating corner of a healthcare sector rife with shortcomings and unmet needs. What’s maddening in this case is that government funding has declined even as the potential for improving mental health has increased. Worse, perhaps, is how a backward mental health system routinely inflicts harm on those people who come in contact with it.

via Hope on Mental Health, With an Unusual Funding Model – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.