Capital One is Funding Digital Skills. Here’s Why. — Inside Philanthropy

If your boss told you to tweet something for her, would you know what to do? How about if she asked you to help with the company’s website or database management?

If you don’t have these skills at the ready, you’re not alone. Now, Capital One, along with the Obama administration, is launching a new effort to get more workers prepared for the challenges of a digitally-intensive labor market.

While many job sectors took a big hit in the Great Recession, one area where growth consistently rises is jobs requiring digital skills. So you can see why Capital One is homing in on this area as it pushes into workforce development—one of several big banks now focusing big philanthropic dollars on helping bridge the divide between employer needs and the current population of job-seekers.

via Another Bank Is Giving Big to Boost Worker Skills. Here’s Why. – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Guess Who’s Becoming a Major Grantmaker for Workforce Development? Walmart – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Walmart’s goal in funding a new $100 million initiative is to make training and advancement more accessible to low-wage, unskilled, and uneducated workers—and maybe even get them on a path to the middle class.

Guess Who’s Becoming a Major Grantmaker for Workforce Development? Walmart – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

The Urgency of Now: Michael Smith and the White House’s Message to Funders – Inside Philanthropy

The Obama administration has broken new ground in bringing together the power of philanthropy and government. Near the center of that effort is Michael Smith, the White House aide in charge of My Brother’s Keeper.

The Urgency of Now: Michael Smith and the White House’s Message to Funders – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

The Sandler Way: Where Big Philanthropy Meets the Art of Common Sense – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

If you hang around the more professionalized precincts of philanthropy—like big name foundations with their armies of Ph.D.s or major consulting firms—the business of giving away large amounts of money can seem awfully complicated. (Hence all those Ph.D.s.)

But if you talk with Herb Sandler, as I did recently, it sounds pretty darn simple.

via The Sandler Way: Where Big Philanthropy Meets the Art of Common Sense – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Bill and Melinda Gates bet big on the future and philanthropy – Yahoo News

I am thankful for Bill and Melinda Gates and all they have done for so many poor people in the world. But I don’t think philanthropy really has the teeth to address inequality in our country. It’s like in Medeival times when the Queen would give out gold coins to the poor. It’s a nice gesture, but it doesn’t solve the underlying problems. Unless philanthropy can change the tax structure and income distribution problems we have, it will remain a token effort to address inequality.

 

Bill and Melinda Gates bet big on the future and philanthropy – Yahoo News.

What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

The Knight Foundation took another step forward in its work to bolster U.S. cities recently, by identifying 126 finalists in its Cities Challenge. All 26 of Knight’s communities of focus for the challenge are represented in the pool of finalists and the winners will divvy up $5 million in funding.

Over 7,000 ideas were submitted for the challenge, coming from public and government organizations, design experts, urban planning organizations, and individual citizens.

via What is the Knight Foundation’s Vision for Urban Renewal? We Just Got More Hints – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Speak-Out for Good Jobs & Quality Care at RI Hospital

From our union brothers and sisters:

Some Certified Nursing Assistants report having to buy their own equipment to make sure they can monitor patients’ oxygen levels. Physical plant workers report troubling shortages of critical equipment they need to combat mold in ventilation ducts to patient and operating rooms. Now the Hospital is threatening to make the situation even worse by laying off more employees.

At the same time, Lifespan – A Health System paid more than $16.6 million in compensation to just ten executives last year. These individuals averaged $1 million more in compensation than the average compensation earned by CEOs of nonprofit hospitals nationwide. Meanwhile, Rhode Island’s largest healthcare employer has employees working more forty hours per week that get no health coverage.

Speak-Out for Good Jobs & Quality Care at RI Hospital.