What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy

Attention organizations working on inclusiveness: The Pride Foundation is now open for applications from nonprofit community organizations for projects that enhance the lives and address the needs of LGBTQ youth, adults, and families in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and/or Washington.

Through its Community Grants Program, the Pride Foundation supports a wide variety of efforts to help the LGBTQ community, with a particular emphasis on supporting the most vulnerable and whose needs are currently less visible. The over-arching goal here is to create systemic change that will eliminate barriers long-term for LGBT individuals and families.

via What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy.

Still in the Dark: Why Philanthropy Remains a Black Box — Inside Philanthropy

When I started Inside Philanthropy 18 months ago, I was certainly interested in the age-old questions about transparency and accountability in the sector, but I can’t say I was preoccupied with them. To me, the most exciting stories are about how funders are trying to solve big problems, often in new ways. I still think that, and IP tries to tell those stories every day at a moment when more cool funders are doing more cool things than ever.

Over time, though, I’ve become ever more frustrated by just how hard it is to gauge what philanthropists are doing or who in this sector is having the most impact.

Compared to earlier times, I know the sector is doing a better job of assessing itself. And I know that more answers are now available to certain questions, like how grantees perceive funders, what kinds of collaborations are most successful, how best to evaluate grants, and so on. All that’s a good thing, and the pioneers of that work—like the Center for Effective Philanthropy—have moved the ball forward in impressive ways.

via Still in the Dark: Why Philanthropy Remains a Black Box – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Who Will Watch the Charities? by David Callahan NYTimes.com

LAST week federal authorities disclosed that four cancer charities had bilked tens of millions of dollars from donors. Questions continue to surface about the lack of transparency at the Clinton Foundation. Philanthropy, we’re learning, is a world with too much secrecy and too little oversight. Despite its increasing role in American society, from education to the arts to the media, perhaps no sector is less accountable to outsiders.

The charitable sector is a bit like the Wild West — by design. Foundations have long been granted expansive freedom, on the view that the diversity of America’s civil society is one of the country’s signature strengths, as Alexis de Tocqueville famously said, and that government shouldn’t mess with this magic. Both political parties have been content to impose a minimum of rules on philanthropy.

via Who Will Watch the Charities? – NYTimes.com.

To Create an Inclusive Economy, Rockefeller Coaxes Business To Change How It Thinks – Inside Philanthropy

The concept of resilience is a great one to have planted in your brain early, and in fact, studies have shown that the more you know about and think about your own psychological resilience, the stronger you can become. But let’s face it—many people don’t really know what resilience means.

So what is resilience? It’s a term most frequently applied in the psychological and medical lingo, describing a person’s ability to withstand extreme hardship, trauma, or illness. The idea is that, constitutionally, people with more resilience are stronger.

via To Create an Inclusive Economy, Rockefeller Coaxes Business To Change How It Thinks – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

What’s Citi Doing to Help Low Income Youth Get on a Path to Career Success? – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

We’ve been following Citi’s Pathways to Progress efforts for about a year, and now the grant-making to nonprofits in this arena is really taking off. This work is amping up employment opportunities for low-income youth, and it’s a great way to build a more inclusive economy.

via What’s Citi Doing to Help Low Income Youth Get on a Path to Career Success? – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Seven Cities Compete for $3 Million to Drive Innovation and Create Jobs – Workforce Grants – Inside Philanthropy

May 19th is going to be a very big day for three of the seven cities competing for urban renewal dollars from Living Cities and the Citi Foundation. Three cities will find out on May 19th that they are the winners, cashing in on a $3 million jackpot to help drive innovation and workforce development in their hometowns.

Seven U.S. cities have made it to the final round of the Living Cities City Accelerator—Albuquerque, Atlanta, Baltimore, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, New Orleans and Seattle—from which three cities will be chosen for the investment of $3 million dollars from Living Cities and the Citi Foundation to adopt innovative city plans to support low-income populations.

via Seven Cities Compete for $3 Million to Drive Innovation and Create Jobs – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

What’s First Data Corporation Doing for Veterans? – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy

One employer making a mark in the area of philanthropy for veterans is First Data Corporation. This global leader in payments technology recently announced a $7 million dollar seven-year commitment to the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University.

This initiative touches on the company’s commitment to veterans in two ways: both as an employer of veterans, and as a provider of services to veteran-owned businesses. With a particular focus on veterans transitioning out of the military and back into civilian life, this grant will go toward education, research, training and job opportunities for veterans and their spouses pursuing business careers.

via What’s First Data Corporation Doing for Veterans? – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.