The Money Behind a Push to Bolster Black Male Leaders Across the U.S. – Inside Philanthropy

Attention to race keeps growing in the United States, and that’s true for a bunch of reasons. But, for sure, philanthropy has played a role in elevating race to the top of the national agenda.

Well before the events in Ferguson last year, a number of top foundations were already investing in new work to address racial inequities and empower leaders of color. Most notably, ten top foundations partnered with the White House in February 2014 to address the challenges facing young men of color. And nearly a year earlier, 26 foundations had come together in Chicago, pledging new work in this same area. As we’ve also reported, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched a big initiative on young men and boys of color, Forward Promise, in 2011. Looking even further back, the Open Society Foundations began its Campaign for Black Male Achievement in 2008.

via The Money Behind a Push to Bolster Black Male Leaders Across the U.S. – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Data Analytics and Child Protection in Los Angeles | The Chronicle of Social Change

On Wednesday, July 22, Los Angeles County’s recently formed Office of Child Protection will hold a community forum to discuss the simultaneously disquieting and promising prospect of using “big data” to help determine which children are the most likely to be abused.

The question of whether child welfare agencies should apply a statistical discipline called “predictive analytics,” which uses data to infer what may happen in the future, has sparked a now global debate weighing civil liberties, racial profiling and the alluring potential of accurately directing limited public funds to better protect children. Despite the understandable fears that come with applying an algorithm to the very human question of family dysfunction versus family strength, evidence from its use in other child welfare administrations shows promise.

via Data Analytics and Child Protection in Los Angeles | The Chronicle of Social Change.

Funders Stick With a Think Tank for Workers, Whose Moment Has Now Arrived – Inside Philanthropy

We’ve been writing a lot lately about the role of philanthropy in influencing public policy, with examples of this popping up often in recent months—like the victorious battle for same-sex marriage, the mounting success of the “war on coal,” and the new overtime rule that the Obama administration recently proposed.

In regard to that overtime rule, we wrote about the National Employment Law Project, and all it has done to draw attention to weak and outdated labor regulations. NELP, we noted, has received $15 million in funding from the Ford Foundation since 2009.

via Funders Stick With a Think Tank for Workers, Whose Moment Has Now Arrived – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

In Case You Missed It: The Subtext of an LGBT Gift by a Silicon Valley Power Couple – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

If you’ve been reading Inside Philanthropy lately, you know that a number of tech companies and leaders have stepped forward in the past year to address gender issues in tech with philanthropic initiatives. Awareness on this issue is finally growing, although change is still slow.

Now imagine that you are lesbian or transgender. The lack of representation for these minorities in the tech world is not even tracked for data, but based on the experiences of trans and lesbian people in the field, the need for more work on equity for this group is very real. With a high level of isolation and very few role models, lesbian and transgender folks face added challenges in starting and maintaining careers in the tech industry.

via In Case You Missed It: The Subtext of an LGBT Gift by a Silicon Valley Power Couple – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy

Attention organizations working on inclusiveness: The Pride Foundation is now open for applications from nonprofit community organizations for projects that enhance the lives and address the needs of LGBTQ youth, adults, and families in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and/or Washington.

Through its Community Grants Program, the Pride Foundation supports a wide variety of efforts to help the LGBTQ community, with a particular emphasis on supporting the most vulnerable and whose needs are currently less visible. The over-arching goal here is to create systemic change that will eliminate barriers long-term for LGBT individuals and families.

via What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy.

Still in the Dark: Why Philanthropy Remains a Black Box — Inside Philanthropy

When I started Inside Philanthropy 18 months ago, I was certainly interested in the age-old questions about transparency and accountability in the sector, but I can’t say I was preoccupied with them. To me, the most exciting stories are about how funders are trying to solve big problems, often in new ways. I still think that, and IP tries to tell those stories every day at a moment when more cool funders are doing more cool things than ever.

Over time, though, I’ve become ever more frustrated by just how hard it is to gauge what philanthropists are doing or who in this sector is having the most impact.

Compared to earlier times, I know the sector is doing a better job of assessing itself. And I know that more answers are now available to certain questions, like how grantees perceive funders, what kinds of collaborations are most successful, how best to evaluate grants, and so on. All that’s a good thing, and the pioneers of that work—like the Center for Effective Philanthropy—have moved the ball forward in impressive ways.

via Still in the Dark: Why Philanthropy Remains a Black Box – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Who Will Watch the Charities? by David Callahan NYTimes.com

LAST week federal authorities disclosed that four cancer charities had bilked tens of millions of dollars from donors. Questions continue to surface about the lack of transparency at the Clinton Foundation. Philanthropy, we’re learning, is a world with too much secrecy and too little oversight. Despite its increasing role in American society, from education to the arts to the media, perhaps no sector is less accountable to outsiders.

The charitable sector is a bit like the Wild West — by design. Foundations have long been granted expansive freedom, on the view that the diversity of America’s civil society is one of the country’s signature strengths, as Alexis de Tocqueville famously said, and that government shouldn’t mess with this magic. Both political parties have been content to impose a minimum of rules on philanthropy.

via Who Will Watch the Charities? – NYTimes.com.