Who’s Empowering Wonks to Fuel Economic Growth in American Cities? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Bloomberg Philanthropies made our list of most interesting foundations in 2014 because of its wide range of huge gifts, signaling ways the foundation may be forging new giving paths in Michael Bloomberg’s first year outside of the mayor’s office. But there’s one interesting initiative at BP we haven’t talked about much, one that’s been getting big funding and spreading to new areas: Bloomberg’s Innovation Teams.

This initiative is mainly associated with Mike Bloomberg’s wonky obsession with making government more efficient. But it also offers insights into how one of America’s top funders aims to foster economic growth and job creation in U.S. cities, a challenge which has cofounded many foundations and yet is attracting new energy amid a growing focus on urban renewal.

via Who’s Empowering Wonks to Fuel Economic Growth in American Cities? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Behind the Knight Foundation’s Push to Revive Akron – Workforce Grants – Inside Philanthropy

Four decades after de-industrialization began in the 1970s, reviving jobs and opportunity in battered manufacturing cities across the U.S. remains a daunting challenge.

Various foundations have come at this problem from different angles over the years, and one funder that’s especially focused here these days is the Knight Foundation. In September, the foundation announced a new $5 million Knight Cities Challenge, seeking ideas to make cities more successful, with a particular eye on attracting and retaining talented people, and creating economic opportunity.

via Behind the Knight Foundation’s Push to Revive Akron – Workforce | Labor | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Can Innovation Help the Poor Escape from Payday Lenders? Ford Thinks So – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

The Ford Foundation has been working to close the racial wealth gap for over two decades, a gap much in the news these days, and one part of that effort has been to help “unbanked” low-income people escape from the shady world of payday lending and worse, and access the financial services that middle-class people take for granted. To that end, Ford recently gave $1 million dollars to the Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI) to continue its work on building financial tools for the underserved.

Can Innovation Help the Poor Escape from Payday Lenders? Ford Thinks So – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Behind the New Housing Developments for LGBT Seniors – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy

LGBT seniors in Philadelphia now have a new housing option in the “Gayborhood,” the nickname for the neighborhood where the William Way Residence opened. The 56-unit housing development, funded by the Dr. Magnus Hirshfeld Fund, is a haven for elderly LGBT folks who need affordable housing.

via Behind the New Housing Developments for LGBT Seniors – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy.

Dept. of Obscure Yet Crucial Funding Niches: Helping Grieving Children — Inside Philanthropy

Grief is one of the most difficult emotions for adults to work through. For children, the process can be even more confusing and overwhelming, with lifetime consequences if feelings are not acknowledged and resolved. The New York Life Foundation is one of the few donors thinking about this issue, and recently made a $1.4 million investment in work in this area. While this is definitely a niche funding area, it’s also a wise way to prevent later difficulties for children who’ve lost somebody important.

via Dept. of Obscure Yet Crucial Funding Niches: Helping Grieving Children  – Children | Youth | Grants – Inside Philanthropy.

Teach for America on Page One Above the Search Results for “Diane Ravitch” Google

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I’m waiting for the day when organizations are paying to be on my google search results page. Meanwhile, Diane Ravitch already has Teach for America as a parasite for her search results. While in some ways it’s a tribute to the strength of Ravitch’s voice in the education reform debate, it’s also kind of creepy. For people who don’t notice the difference between ads and search results — like kids trying to educate themselves, for example — it could be very misleading and confusing.