RI Delegates Announce Funding for Prevention of Dating Violence

From the office of Sheldon Whitehouse:

Delegation Announces $791,000 in Federal Funding to Help Combat Teen Dating Violence

Providence, RI – Today, U.S. Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and Congressmen Jim Langevin and David Cicilline announced $791,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for a study on teen dating violence, which will be conducted at Rhode Island Hospital and will focus on aggressive attitudes among middle school-aged boys.

Rhode Island Hospital and Klein Buendel, Inc., a technology research company, will use the funds to study the effectiveness of web-based games and videos in limiting aggressiveness among 8th grade boys. Researchers will also examine how to foster better communication between boys and their parents; previous studies have shown that parental involvement can be a significant risk factor for dating violence. Test subjects will be drawn from the greater Providence area. Findings from the study will be reported to DOJ’s National Institute of Justice for use in research and programming on teen dating violence.

“Significant progress has been made in preventing domestic violence and going after offenders. Yet, recent high profile events remind us that domestic violence continues, so we still have a long way to go. These federal funds will help educate more young people about the need to end domestic violence and sexual assault and advance gender equality,” said Reed, who helped pass the Violence Against Women Act.

“I am happy to see federal funding coming to Rhode Island to research this serious problem,” said Whitehouse, who wrote a provision in the re-authorization of the Violence Against Woman Act (VAWA) to help reduce teen dating violence. “Too many women are subjected to violence as teenagers, and often at the hands of the young men they are dating. Better understanding its causes will help us reduce future incidence of violence and keep our kids safe.”

“Violence begets violence, and early signs of aggression can be an indicator that the pattern could continue in later years. By focusing on young men and addressing these violent behaviors early on, this program aims to stop the cycle of abuse before it starts,” said Langevin. “Teen dating violence is an all-too-common occurrence, and I applaud the Department of Justice’s efforts to identify and address its root cause.”

“Intimidation, stalking, and violence are unacceptable and especially alarming when they are part of our children’s relationships,” said Cicilline. “Families and communities need the information and training to stop teen dating violence and I commend Rhode Island Hospital for advancing these important efforts.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nine percent of students across the country have reported being physically hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend in the past year.

Outdoor Concerts and Other Pawtuxet Village Events

From the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market:

The weather prognosticators tell us that the heat and humidity will moderate by tomorrow, and that Saturday promises to be dry and sunny with temps in the low 80s. A perfect day for the market (and those rapidly ripening tomatoes we hope to be enjoying any day now!), and for picking up some great fish, veggies and meats for the grill.

It’s been great to have the options for salads and other cold foods on the steamy days we had this week: smoked bluefish from The Local Catch, fresh Chevre from Beltane Farm, hard-boiled eggs from gC Farm, sun gold tomatoes from Blue Skys, barely braised broccoli rabe from Pak Express, strawberries from Rocky Ledge Farm, frankfurters from PV Farmstand, wonderful lettuces from all our farmers. Cucumbers, summer squash and all kinds of green and yellow goodies continue to appear.

More hot goodies for hot days: Terry Yeaw will be back this week with samples of her pepper jellies. We hope that her green tomato salsa will be making an appearance soon, too.

LeFavorite Bakery is on vacation this week, so our guest bakery will be Little Falls Cafe. Mouth-watering scones and other goodies from Jessica’s kitchen will be available.

There are not one but TWO free outdoor music events tonight: in Edgewood and Pawtuxet Village:

At the William Hall Library, 1825 Broad St, Cranston:

Old2Kool performs at this week’s free concert at William Hall Library. The second performance of the Music in Our Town series, Old2Kool brings a touch of retro and a set list of oldies to the library’s front lawn. “Music In Our Town” is sponsored by the City of Cranston Parks & Recreation Department. Concerts are free and open to the public. Performances will take place on various Thursdays, at 6:30 PM, through the beginning of August.

For the rest of their summer calendar:

http://eventkeeper.com/code/events.cfm?curOrg=CRANSTON

And at Pawtuxet Park. Narrangansett Parkway, Warwick, the friends of Pawtuxet Village presents:
July Jazz Jam: Thursday • July 10 6:30 – 8:00 PM

Young musicians are welcome to join us. Bring your instrument: trumpet, trombone, guitar (electrical outlet available for up to 3 instruments), keyboard, bass guitar, drums, etc.
If you don’t play an instrument, bring a picnic and lawn chair, enjoy the music.
For more info on their events:

https://www.facebook.com/PawtuxetFriends

See you at the market.

Gluten Freedom — An Essential Guide to Gluten Issues, with Recipes!

glufreeDuring the writing of my own book on cooking to nourish your archetypes, I read Gluten Freedom by Dr. Alessio Fasano, MD, Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Given that many of my own recipes feature gluten-free alternatives, I was eager to read an expert’s version of the history of gluten-related illnesses and to learn more about the current state of treatment. Dr. Fasano’s book did not disappoint. The book contains a comprehensive review of the spectrum of gluten-related disorders, and also includes chapters on discussing leaky gut (you’ll get introduced to zonulin) as well as gluten’s influence on brain chemistry. Gluten Freedom also discusses new treatments and therapies, including enzyme therapy, a “celiac pill” treatment, and the possible development of a therapeutic vaccine. The book also talks about methods for prevention including delaying gluten introduction until one year of age, which is now being studied.

Taking the subject to a richer level of detail and creativity, Gluten Freedom also offers several recipes to remove gluten from the menu including all-time favorites like chocolate chip cookies and gluten-free scones. There is a charming chapter called “Dinner with Dr. Fasano” where we learn about the region, Campania, where Dr. Fasano spent his childhood. He then offers what sounds like a heavenly five-course meal of gluten-free specialties including Capri Salad featuring Mozzarella di bufala di Campania — the soft mozzarella cheese from the Dr.’s home region.

I like how this book provides comprehensive information on gluten issues including an appendix of apps for mobile phones as well as an extensive list for recommended reading. There are also some excellent practical features like a “Wheat Alert” table of menu items that contain wheat, and a stage-by-stage life guide for how to avoid gluten from cradle to grave.

After finishing the book, I was still left with a question, which I posed to the authors: “Is there any value in a low-gluten diet even if you don’t have gluten sensitivity? Does it help to diversify the grains we eat? If gluten calories are substituted with more fruits and vegetables, would that be better for overall health?”

Pam Cureton, one of the contributing writers for the book and a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment, responded:

“No, there is no advantage to following a low-gluten diet for those who tolerate gluten. There is, however, an advantage to eating more whole, natural foods and reducing the amount of processed foods to reduce unwanted levels of sodium, sugar, fats and extra calories. For people who tolerate gluten, these are the problem ingredients, not the wheat, rye or barley. Including these as whole grains along with other ancient grains, amaranth, millet, sorghum and others, would benefit everyone.”

I’m glad my own oatmeal-chocolate chip cookie recipe contains sorghum! Thanks, Pam! And thanks to Dr. Fasano and all the contributors to Gluten Freedom — helping us navigate this difficult health and dietary issue.

Link to Gluten Freedom on Amazon