Small Investors Just Proved Why Fed’s ‘Wealth Effect’ Is Bogus

Kiersten Marek:

Some interesting analysis on why the “wealth effect” is not happening, and statistics on how little the American public knows about recent events in the stock market.

Originally posted on Your Newsline Independent Reporting From Around The World :

The American public is astute about a lot of things, but the stock market – despite all the hoopla in the media and even on NPR – apparently isn’t one of them. That’s what the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index survey found.

And it raises some thorny issues about the Fed’s strategy to print a few trillion dollars and force interest rates down to near zero in order, as it said, to inflate stocks and other financial assets, thereby triggering the “wealth effect,” which would stimulate the Main Street economy. This is, of course, precisely what has not happened. And the American investing public just told us why.

The survey asked American investors with $10,000 or more in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, or in a self-directed IRA or 401(k) – so not the entire American public but only those who have a stake in the markets – to comment on…

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Sauerkraut: A Superfood You Should Be Eating

Kiersten Marek:

A good primer on all the benefits of homemade sauerkraut, with recipe!

Originally posted on The Rogue Vegan:

The other day, I decided to make some raw, homemade sauerkraut, since it had been a while since I made any. It is one of the top foods I would recommend incorporating into your diet. 70% of your immune system lies in your gut so it is really important that we have the necessary bacteria present to fight off any pathogens that may enter our system.

Reasons I love using cabbage:
1) Unique cancer preventative properties with respect to bladder, colon and
prostate cancer.
2) Rich in antioxidants
3) Rich in anti-inflammatories

Cancer prevention tops all other areas of health research in regards to cabbage. It is impressive in terms of antioxidants, which is partly responsible for its cancer prevention benefits. You can also count on cabbage to provide cardiovascular support in reducing cholesterol. The fiber in cabbage binds to bile acids and when this happens, your liver replaces the…

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Nexus Has to be Nursed Back to Life After Battery Dies

So, I’m not one to do a lot of ranting about products, and there are many features to my Nexus that I appreciate, but one I don’t appreciate is the need to nurse it back to life in 15 to 45 minute procedures involving multiple steps every time the battery dies. Here is what happened recently: I took my Nexus for a walk to raise money for the World Food Programme. I came home and put it on the sideboard. When I went to look at it the next day and resume my walk, it was dead. I tried turning it on — got nothing but a tiny flare of light in the middle button on the screen. I went on another computer (good thing I have two) and looked up what to do next. I followed multiple instructions including:

  • Plugging it in to a computer.
  • Allowing it to sit for 5 minutes. Trying to turn it on again. 
  • Unplugging it and plugging it back in within 10 seconds. Trying to turn it on again.
  • Allowing it to sit for 15 minutes, trying it again. This time I got the outline of a battery, which was supposed to mean that if I held the power button for 15 to 30 seconds, it should turn on, but it didn’t.
  • Allowing it to sit for another 15 minutes, then trying it again, at which time it deigned to turn back on again.

Am I crazy or is this a lot of time to be spending nursing an electronic back to life? So a little word to the wise: if you are going to buy a new handheld, you might want to read some reviews and find out how the battery life works on that device. This was an unexpected side job that I got with my Nexus: the job of Chief Nurse and Technician for a battery that seems to be saying, like the famous Bartleby the Scrivener: “I’d prefer not to.”

Mourning a Great Teacher: Robin Williams

Kiersten Marek:

Rest in peace, Robin Williams. Prayers for his family.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

We have become accustomed in recent years to seeing films in which teachers are shown as lazy, greedy slugs. This fits nicely with the corporate reform narrative that seeks to strip all honor, dignity, and rights from teachers. Teachers don’t deserve those mean-spirited caricatures, nor the treatment they receive from legislatures.

Remembering Robin Williams’ portrayal of English teacher John Keating in “The Dead Poets’ Society” takes us back to another era, a time when the teacher might be seen as a source of wisdom and inspiration, a rebel and a non-conformist. Here is the trailer. Robin Williams represented the teacher as the best that one could hope to be: not just a man who taught language and literature but a man who changed lives.

My favorite scene in the movie occurs when Mr. Keating invites the class to read the introduction to the poetry anthology. The introduction describes a…

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