Tricky Questions on Corporate Philanthropy at Walmart and Beyond – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Walmart’s eighth annual Global Responsibility report came out not long ago, and it suggests that the company is feeling pretty proud of itself. It boosted its minimum wage for associates to $9 an hour in April of this year and will boost it again to $10 in February 2016. That will cost them $1 billion, and represents a big step forward.

Along with increasing wages, Walmart’s philanthropy is also rising, and we report often on what its foundation is doing—which is a lot. Just the other day, for example, it announced $15.5 million in grants to seven nonprofits to help low-income children meet their nutritional needs.

via Tricky Questions on Corporate Philanthropy at Walmart and Beyond – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy

Attention organizations working on inclusiveness: The Pride Foundation is now open for applications from nonprofit community organizations for projects that enhance the lives and address the needs of LGBTQ youth, adults, and families in Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and/or Washington.

Through its Community Grants Program, the Pride Foundation supports a wide variety of efforts to help the LGBTQ community, with a particular emphasis on supporting the most vulnerable and whose needs are currently less visible. The over-arching goal here is to create systemic change that will eliminate barriers long-term for LGBT individuals and families.

via What’s the Pride Foundation Doing for LGBTQ in Western States and Alaska? – LGBT | Grants | Fundraising – Inside Philanthropy.

These Donors Dig Dads: How Fatherhood is Getting Attention From Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy

There’s lots happening in philanthropy these days around fatherhood, and with Father’s Day just around the corner, we figured it was a good time to survey some of more innovative and promising fatherhood-fostering initiatives out there.

But first, a quick review of where we are in time on the role of fathers. Those of us who were fortunate enough to benefit from a positive fathering relationship understand the massive value of this. But having a nurturing and involved father was not always the norm, and in different times in America’s history, father involvement in the family has come in and out of fashion. Fathers in Colonial times were more involved with children since religious beliefs dictated that work and home duties be closely aligned, whereas 19th century industrialization required men to work away from home and resulted in women being relegated as sole caretakers of the home and children as well as “dependents” on the husband as “provider.”

via These Donors Dig Dads: How Fatherhood is Getting Attention From Philanthropy – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

A Movie Star Gets Behind a Clean Energy Startup, With Help From a Matchmaker – Inside Philanthropy

Originally posted on Kmareka.com:

Philanthropy is getting ever more entwined with venture investing, and many funding efforts are done collaboratively, with smaller foundations teaming up on impact investments with other partners. You can see this in one issue area after the other, as we report often.

One new player making things happen in the clean energy space is PRIME, a nonprofit whose mission is to “accelerate the commercial deployment of technologies that reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.” More specifically, PRIME says it “empowers philanthropic investors with the critical tools they need to make direct, for-profit investments that address climate change.” (See more details here.) In other words, it’s a matchmaker.

via A Movie Star Gets Behind a Clean Energy Startup, With Help From a Matchmaker – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

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A Movie Star Gets Behind a Clean Energy Startup, With Help From a Matchmaker – Inside Philanthropy

Philanthropy is getting ever more entwined with venture investing, and many funding efforts are done collaboratively, with smaller foundations teaming up on impact investments with other partners. You can see this in one issue area after the other, as we report often.

One new player making things happen in the clean energy space is PRIME, a nonprofit whose mission is to “accelerate the commercial deployment of technologies that reduce global greenhouse gas emissions.” More specifically, PRIME says it “empowers philanthropic investors with the critical tools they need to make direct, for-profit investments that address climate change.” (See more details here.) In other words, it’s a matchmaker.

via A Movie Star Gets Behind a Clean Energy Startup, With Help From a Matchmaker – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

If Elected, Jeb Bush Will Privatize Public Education

Kiersten Marek:

We’re already part of the way there. If elected, Jeb Bush will take us as far as privatization can go.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Matthew Pulver, writing at Salon.com, describes Jeb Bush’s dangerous belief in privatization and free markets in education.

It is not so much a belief as an ideology, one that is impervious to evidence. The many studies showing thAt privately managed charters do not get higher test scores than public schools do not register with Jeb. The numbers of charters that open with grand promises and soon lose their doors with big debts does not affect his belief system. He is a zealot for school choice, period.

Not even the failure of the charter school he founded in Liberty City, a poor black neighborhood, dampens his passion for charters and vouchers.

Writes Pulver:

“There’s nothing else as large in all of society. Not the military—nothing—is bigger.”

“That’s how Randy Best, Jeb Bush’s business partner, sees public education, as an untapped market where untold billions are to be made when kids and…

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Why foundations should embrace radical transparency

Originally posted on Nonprofit Chronicles:

TransparencyPhilanthropy is a “black box,” writes David Callahan, the founder and editor of Inside Philanthropy. “If you don’t think philanthropy is maddeningly opaque, it’s because you’re deep inside the sector.”

He’s exaggerating, but not by much. Some foundations don’t disclose their donors. All are required by law to report on their grants, but many are slow to do so. Finally, there’s scant information about the most important question of all: How effective are foundations when they spend their money?

Foundations would do well to become radically more transparent and accountable, not merely for their own sake, but to set an example for the nonprofits they fund. After all, if foundations, with their influence, deep pockets and professional staff, don’t demand more transparency and accountability from nonprofits, who will? They are key to unlocking the immense potential of the nonprofit sector.

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