Memo to Funders: Fight Exclusionary Zoning to Make Headway Against Inequality – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Hell, yes, the rent is too damn high, higher than ever in fact. The reasons why are myriad: a shortage of rental properties, millions of families de-homed in the financial crash, and lending restrictions that have been tightened up in the process of financial recovery. The building sector is still recovering from the crash as well, so new housing hasn’t been added at the same pace as before the Great Recession. Meanwhile, family income, when adjusted for inflation is below what it was in 1989.

via Memo to Funders: Fight Exclusionary Zoning to Make Headway Against Inequality – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Guess Who’s Becoming a Major Grantmaker for Workforce Development? Walmart – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Walmart’s goal in funding a new $100 million initiative is to make training and advancement more accessible to low-wage, unskilled, and uneducated workers—and maybe even get them on a path to the middle class.

Guess Who’s Becoming a Major Grantmaker for Workforce Development? Walmart – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

American families are stuck in a lost quarter century

Originally posted on Quartz:

Mark it down as another bleak milestone for the American middle class.

The US Census Bureau just published its annual update on income and poverty in the US. The data amount to one of the best report cards on the economic health of the US middle class.

At first blush, the news on incomes doesn’t look so horrible. Inflation-adjusted US median household incomes was essentially flat 2013—the Census Bureau said the rise to $51,939, wasn’t a statistically significant increase from 2012’s $51,758. (The median income is exact midpoint of the US income distribution. In other words, half the US households have incomes that are higher, and half have incomes that are lower.)

median-income2013

But the bigger picture is not great. Effectively, inflation-adjusted US median household incomes are still about 1% below where they were in 1989. That’s nearly 25 years ago. And median household incomes are still 9% below the all-time peak back in 1999, when they…

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New Ideas, New Funders: Has the Asset Building Movement Finally Arrived? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Recently we talked with Bob Friedman about the early days of the asset building movement and how this work drew in funders. Here, in our second article based on that conversation, we hear his thoughts on where the movement is today and where it may be going.

via New Ideas, New Funders: Has the Asset Building Movement Finally Arrived? – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Hope on Mental Health, With an Unusual Funding Model – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence

Mental health is easily the most frustrating corner of a healthcare sector rife with shortcomings and unmet needs. What’s maddening in this case is that government funding has declined even as the potential for improving mental health has increased. Worse, perhaps, is how a backward mental health system routinely inflicts harm on those people who come in contact with it.

via Hope on Mental Health, With an Unusual Funding Model – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.

Whitehouse and Cornyn Meet with Obama on Criminal Justice

From the Whitehouse Press office:

Washington, DC – Today President Obama and Vice President Biden convened a meeting at the White House to discuss criminal justice reform efforts with key members of Congress, including U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). Whitehouse, a lead sponsor of the CORRECTIONS Act along with Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), released the statement below regarding the meeting:

“Both Republican and Democratic leaders agree we can pass meaningful criminal justice reform measures this year, and I was grateful for the opportunity to discuss how to best move forward. Senator Cornyn and I have already built a strong bipartisan consensus around our legislation to better prepare inmates for re-entering society and reduce the risk that they’ll commit future crimes, and I strongly support the effort led by other Senators to reform our sentencing laws. I’m hopeful that we will be able to achieve both prison and sentencing reform this year, and I thank President Obama and Vice President Biden for their leadership on this important issue.”

According to the White House, other Senators attending today’s meeting included Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Dick Durbin (D-IL), Cory Booker (D-NJ), Rand Paul (R-KY), and Mike Lee (R-UT).

The CORRECTIONS Act would improve public safety and save taxpayer money by requiring prisoners to participate in recidivism reduction programs and allowing certain eligible prisoners to earn up to 25 percent of their sentence in prerelease custody for successful completion of these programs. The programs, which can include things like vocational training and substance abuse treatment, have been proven to help former prisoners successfully re-acclimate to society upon release and to reduce the risk that they will commit future crimes.

The Funders Who Can Claim Some Credit for the Massive Uptick in ACA Enrollment – Inside Philanthropy

Back in the spring of 2013, when plans for the first enrollment period for ACA were underway, funders were skittish about the public knowing of their support for enrollment efforts, fearing negative backlash from conservative critics. Now, with the White House’s recent announcement that 11.4 million Americans have successfully signed up for Obamacare, funders are more openly acknowledging their support for enrollment efforts.

via The Funders Who Can Claim Some Credit for the Massive Uptick in ACA Enrollment – Inside Philanthropy: Fundraising Intelligence – Inside Philanthropy.