Monthly Archives: November, 2012

How We Heal: By Joining a Community and Connecting with Others Who Have Been Similarly Wounded


One of the recommendations I make in “Know Thyself” for expressing and healing your Wounded Child is to volunteer for an organization that helps others. One of the ways that I help children heal from trauma is also by inviting them to join the community of my office by contributing something to the Rainbow Wall, a wall of arts and crafts creations made by children in the process of therapy. This wall helps children to know they are not alone, and that even in their suffering, they have something to give to others, which is a representation of progress and hope.

Stop the Presses! Chickens in Cranston!

Rhode Island Tweets ‏@RhodyTweets

#thatssocranston “@CranstonPatch: Welp, ordinance passes 5-4. You can legally raise backyard chickens in Cranston.”

They better watch out, hawks are back too.

New Winter Farmer’s Market Starting in Cranston

From newly re-elected City Councilmember Steve Stycos:

EDGEWOOD WINTER MARKET

Beginning Thursday November 29, Cranston will have its own winter farmer’s market at Edgewood Congregational Church. 1788 Broad Street. The market will be held Thursday evenings from 5:30-7:30, every OTHER week, in the church which is across the street from William Hall Library.

Vendors from the Pawtuxet Village Farmers Market will offer local seasonal produce, honey, seafood, pastured meats, and freshly prepared farm kitchen delights, as well as the fabulous offerings of the Presto Strange-O Coffee Truck! We hope the winter market will supply another local food source and additional income for our farmers.

Please support this new community effort, and spread the word! This market will start as CASH ONLY, since it’s a pilot venture. The only exception is for EBT/SNAP benefits. We will accept EBT payments at the winter market.

EDGEWOOD AUTHOR

Wednesday, December 19 from 6:30-8:00 p.m, Edgewood author Adam Braver will read from his latest book, Misfit, at the William Hall Library. The public is welcome.

EDGEWOOD JAZZ

The Hall Library winter jazz series continues Sunday November 25, Sunday December 2 and Sunday December 9 with free concerts beginning at 2 PM at the Hall Library on Broad Street, Cranston.

See you at the winter market.

Who Was David Kato and Why Should We Care?

David Kato got up on the net briefly following his murder in 2011. He knew that he walked with a target on his back every day he lived as a gay-rights advocate in war-scarred Uganda.

This may seem far-removed from American politics, but there’s more than Ugandan trauma and prejudice at play here. American Evangelical ministers and politicians see a fertile mission field for converts and allies. Ugandan politicians, on their part, see a chance to make connections with Americans who wield power in Congress.

And who loses? Just some Ugandan citizens and organizers who have less power than Jews in pre-war Germany. This comparison is not made lightly. Proposed laws would spark an internal war on gay Ugandans, their associates, and anyone who could be labelled as gay- whatever their orientation and lifestyle.

And this is not hypothetical. Uganda has not recovered from recent civil wars. This is a match to gasoline. The name of Idi Amin is familiar to some Americans, there are other disastrous regimes that afflicted Uganda.

To see more about David Kato and the American snake-oil preachers who set him up for the hit, see here.

If you’re wondering why a Kenyan witch-hunter blessed Sarah Palin in her Alaska church, there’s an answer. It’s a small world now.

An Excuse to Sleep Late on Friday

Liberate Your Friday

If you want to enjoy some good company and a chance to help your neighbor, here’s one of many opportunities the season offers (thank you Phil Edmonds)…

16th Annual Buy Nothing Day Coat Exchange

Thinking globally, acting locally.

The Providence 16th annual Buy Nothing Day Coat Exchange takes place Friday November 23rd 10AM-1PM on the State House lawn, opposite Providence Place mall (rain/snow site Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 15 Hayes St. on north side of mall).

Buy Nothing Day began in 1992 by Adbusters Media Foundation in Vancouver, Canada, as a way to resist the advertising industry that abets over-consumption by causing people to feel unfulfilled with what they have. Since then, Buy Nothing Day has evolved into a

global phenomenon creating awareness of how entangled we are in the web of consumerism.

One may ask: “will it really make any difference if I buy nothing on the November 23 ?” If more and more people join the millions worldwide who do observe Buy Nothing Day, then the answer is yes. A quote from Hope’s Edge by Frances Moore Lappe and Anna Lappe helps put this into perspective.

What we choose to buy, where we choose to shop, even whether we choose to be part of campaigns…all this is not a homage to some weighty obligation; it’s a celebration of the world we want…My choices as a consumer used to feel so small, but now I’m convinced they have real power. Together we are a sleeping giant and, awakened, we can really stir things up.

While critics of the day charge that Buy Nothing Day simply causes participants to buy the next day, Adbusters state that it “isn’t just about changing your habits for one day but about starting a lasting lifestyle commitment to consuming less and producing less waste.”

Another focus of Buy Nothing Day is to “stir things up” – with a clear message that we no longer will be duped by the endless advertisements telling us the way to happiness. People are beginning to question this consumer-globalized economics way of life realizing we are not as happy as we thought we were, and as a result, are thinking more and taking steps in daily living where quality, rather than quantity, is the priority.

With global warming, along with the depletion of some of our natural resources and the loss of many species of life as a result of over-consumption, our planet is at a breaking point, and it is time to face up to it. Let’s think globally and act locally. On Friday November 23rd stop by the State House lawn in a show of solidarity for Buy Nothing Day. If you have a winter coat to donate, please drop one off; if you need a coat, come pick one up.

More on this at Rhode Island’s Future from Greg Gerritt

And Bob Plain say that Americans would like to save the tinsel until after Thanksgiving.

What Animals Do for Our Mental Health

In my book, “Know Thyself: A Kid’s Guide to the Archetypes,” I recommend that children watch or play with animals in order to become more aware of the Innocent Archetype — the naturally curious part of our identity. Research into how animals affect our mental health is just in its infancy, but so far there are some compelling studies to suggest that animals can contribute to mental health on a number of levels and across a wide span of ages and mental health problems.

I have done some searching and reading, and here are some good resources on the growing body of evidence that pet ownership and spending time around animals has a positive correlation to physical and mental health.

From Australia, this paper talks about research showing animal-assisted therapy improving mental health for elderly people in nursing homes as well as children diagnosed with ADHD. It also points out that because of financial hardship, pet ownership for some people has become more difficult. It reports that pet ownership was on the decline in Australia due to increased renting and decreasing owning of homes.

The American Humane Association has a good page that talks about animal-assisted work being done with military families and children with cancer. Their hope is that with more clinical trials, animal-assisted therapies will become more mainstream and available for different treatment and caregiving environments.

On this page, Dr. Andrew Weil talks about how animal-assisted therapy and/or pet ownership can alleviate anxiety, depression and social isolation, while improving blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

My discussion of animals in “Know Thyself” is focused primarily on expressing your Innocent, but there are several archetypes that are expressed when animals are a part of our lives. Animals also call forth our Caregiver as we feed and nurture them, and most of us also know people who express a sense of deeper connection with animals — a sense of animals as Soul Mates. Essentially, animals give us the opportunity to express love, which is the basis for so much of what makes life pleasurable and fulfilling.

Kiersten Marek:

Fascinating post on the nature and origins of shame.

Originally posted on A Better NHS:

Masaccio: The Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden 1425

Through the concrete physicality of the two figures and the arid landscape around them, Masaccio makes believable the first dolorous steps of human beings on earth, in the solitude of the shame of sin and the dramatic experience of pain. Quoted from ‘Medicine in Art’ Getty Publications. p.292

One of my patients, June, was standing near the entrance of the surgery when I came back from a home visit. June and I had been through a lot together in the two years since she came to see me with a breast lump, her subsequent mastectomy and chemotherapy, her husband’s dementia and death, and her depression and redundancy, but in recent months she had been steadily recovering and rebuilding her life and her health. The last few times we met she had been really well and we had time to talk…

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Kiersten Marek:

Worth noting: in case you thought charter school takeovers were a done deal, Fitch says their view is “generally negative” for charter schools.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Well, we are into big-time business talk about education.

For-profit colleges are losing market share.

K12 Inc.’s stock price drops after Wells Fargo downgraded its rating in response to the poor performance of K12’s Colorado Virtual Academy, where the graduation rate is 22 percent.

Now a rating agency finds that despite the passage of an ALEC-style amendment in Georgia, allowing a gubernatorial commission to open charters over the objections of local school boards, and despite a likely charter victory in Washington State, the charter sector as a whole is a risky investment. Read the analysis here.

Hey, is any of this about education or just about increasing market share and profits and return-on-investment?

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The Importance of Learning to Quiet Yourself

In my book, Know Thyself: A Kid’s Guide to the Archetypes, I recommend children learn to practice mindfulness and meditation. In essence, one of the most important skills you can learn in life is how to quiet yourself — how to quiet your mind, how to calm your body, and how, when the two are coordinated, you feel more whole and capable. This article from Greater Good Magazine describes how an elementary school in California is teaching meditation. The results are clear — less conflict, less test anxiety, and standardized test scores improved.

Presenting the Evidence for Archetypes-Based Therapy

There is a tremendous amount of evidence to support the practices and suggestions in my book, “Know Thyself: A Kid’s Guide to the Archetypes.” With regard to expressing your Innocent, I advise children to play outdoors every day. Here is a piece of research that shows that outdoor play is one of the most effective antidotes for ADHD.

Over the next few weeks, I will be compiling and publishing links to research that supports the treatment recommendations I offer in my book, as well as research on therapeutic practices with children and families that I teach about in my CEU Course, “Know Thyself: Using Archetypes to Understand and Heal Children.”

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