Kiersten Marek:

Seems like the right thing to do.

Originally posted on Diane Ravitch's blog:

Responding to growing outrage, Mayor Bloomberg reluctantly canceled the annual marathon scheduled for Sunday.

Hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers have no power, heat or water.

First responders are still recovering bodies of victims.

The city is not ready to celebrate.

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5 responses

  1. i can’t believe it was even considered by that megalomaniac-it’d be like dancing on graves

  2. One must wonder at the age in which we live. The Brits were bombed day and night during World War II, and vast areas of London, Coventry, and other cities and countryside were turned into rubble, but they lived their lives, indeed celebrated their stoicism and carried on every day, including concerts, including plays, including life. Hundreds of terror rockets have been fired into Israel over the last weeks–mostly ignored by the world, with people killed, homes destroyed, but Israel cleans up, rebuilds and carries on. One must wonder why doing something other then waiting for “government” to tell us what to do can be a bad thing. The loss of resiliency is but one part of the loss of self-reliance.Perhaps it is the bell-weather of our time. To complain about a positive thing in the midst of bad things is less than characteristic of a strong society. To wait for “government” help is something less than the notion of self determination this country once though important. Fortunately, some of that self reliance remains in the West, if not in the East.

  3. Donald-47,000 people running through the streets during a cleanup/relief effort is just foolish.

  4. I thought it might be a way for New Yorkers to come together, but the view from NYC is different from here, where we just got the edge of the storm, and the people have spoken. I see in the news today that a hotel is refusing to evict storm survivors to make room for marathoners. That’s New York coming together.

  5. I can definitely see both sides of the story here. Continuing with the marathon would have demonstrated the cities resiliency in the face of this horrible natural disaster. Conversely, it would have taken resources and focus away from the recovery efforts.

    Regardless, marathon organizers should have cancelled this event days ago, before the influx of marathon runners into NY. I even read reports of storm victims not being able to get rooms at hotels because they were previously reserved for marathon runners. At least a number of runners are now choosing to stay in NY to help with the relief efforts.

    socialworkburnout.blogspot.com

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